Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for February, 2013

by Sarah Steimer

My baguettes didn't wind up looking quite as sexy as the photos from the original recipe - but they taste and texture was pretty near spot-on for a baguette. I had to make a few tweaks because I don't have a bread stone, but I think the baguettes turned out pretty darn well overall.

My baguettes didn’t wind up looking quite as sexy as the photos from the original recipe — but the taste and texture was pretty darn near spot-on for a baguette. I had to make a few tweaks to the recipe overall: I used an upside-down baking sheet in place of a bread stone and a Dutch oven with ice to create steam instead of a cast iron skillet. I don’t think my tweaks made a huge difference, but learning to bake your own bread involves a lot of trial and error. It takes some time to learn how to knead the dough just right or to figure out the perfect amount of time the bread needs to bake, but you won’t get too many complaints from those who benefit from your experiments.

  • 1 1/2 cups tap water, heated to 115 degrees
  • 1 teaspoon dry active yeast
  • 3 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • oil
  • 1/2 cup ice cubes

Whisk together the yeast and water in a large bowl. Let sit for about 10 minutes, or until the yeast is foamy. Stir the flour in with a fork until dough forms and all the flour is absorbed. Let the dough sit for about 20 minutes so the flour may fully hydrate.

Add the salt to the dough and transfer to a lightly floured surface. Knead the dough for about 10 minutes, or until smooth and elastic. I needed to add additional flour to my surface pretty regularly because the dough was fairly sticky. Just try not to add TOO much flour!

Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Place the bowl in a cold oven and let rest until doubled in size, about 45 minutes.

Working on a lightly floured surface, form the dough into an 8-inch-by-6-inch rectangle. Fold the 8-inch sides toward the middle so the edges meet. Next, fold the 6-inch sides toward the center so those edges meet. Return to the bowl, seam side down, and place in the oven for 1 hour.

Place the dough on a lightly floured surface and cut into three equal pieces. Shape each piece into a 14-inch rope. Place a piece of lightly floured parchment paper on an upside-down baking sheet. Transfer the dough to the parchment. Lift and crease the paper between the ropes to form long pleats. Place two tightly rolled kitchen towels under the long edges of the paper to support the loaves. Cover the dough loosely with plastic wrap and let rise for 50 minutes.

While the dough is rising, place a cast iron skillet on the bottom rack of the oven. Place a baking stone on the rack above the skillet. I do not have a baking stone, so I used an upside-down baking sheet instead. Pre-heat the oven to 475 degrees.

Once the oven is ready, remove the plastic wrap and towels from the dough. Flatten out the paper so the loaves are spaced out. Use a sharp knife or razor to slash the top of each loaf at a 30-degree angle in four spots, with each slash about 4 inches long. Use the edges of the parchment to carefully guide the loaves onto the hot baking stone (this is a good time to have a friend help). Place the ice cubes in the skillet so steam forms, thus allowing the loaves to rise fully before a crust forms.

Bake until the loaves are dark brown and crisp, about 30 minutes. Cool before serving.

Makes three, 14-inch baguettes.

Recipe adapted from: Saveur

*We’re loving the smell of fresh bread wafting from our ovens in February. See all of our On the Rise bread recipes here.

Read Full Post »

by Caitlin Saniga

Don't judge! You'll drop a gremolata-pine nut bomb on your plate, too.

Don’t judge! You’ll drop a gremolata-pine nut bomb on your plate, too.

  • 1/2 cup pine nuts
  • olive oil
  • 1 medium eggplant, cut into 1/2-inch rounds
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 cup chopped parsley
  • zest from 1 lemon
  • 2 large cloves garlic, peeled, trimmed and minced

Heat the oven to 350. Arrange the pine nuts in a single layer on a baking sheet, and toast in the oven until golden and fragrant, about 4 minutes.

Lightly coat the bottom of a large frying pan with olive oil over medium heat. Add a single layer of eggplant slices to the pan. Cook on each side until tender and golden-brown, about 3 minutes per side. Season with salt and pepper. Repeat until all of the eggplant is cooked.

To make the gremolata, combine the parsley, lemon zest and garlic in a small bowl, and lightly season with salt and pepper.

Arrange 3 or 4 eggplant slices on each plate and top with gremolata and pine nuts. Serve immediately.

Makes 3-4 servings.

Read Full Post »

by Sarah Steimer

    This was my Valentine's Day dinner! I narrowed it down to three different fish dishes and let Bill choose his favorite. I served this over a simple fried rice - just rice, veggies and soy sauce.

This was my Valentine’s Day dinner! I narrowed it down to three different fish dishes and let Bill choose his favorite. I served this over a simple fried rice – just rice, veggies and soy sauce.

  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon ginger, finely chopped
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1/2 tablespoon rice or cider vinegar
  • 2 salmon filets, skinless
  • sesame seeds
  • green onion, chopped

Whisk together the honey, soy sauce, ginger, garlic and vinegar. Pour the sauce over the fish either in a shallow rimmed baking dish or in a freezer bag. Let marinade for about 15 minutes

Remove the fish from the container and place on a foil-lined baking sheet. Place under the broiler and cook for about 7 minutes, depending on the thickness of the fish. The salmon is cooked through when it is opaque and can be easily flaked with a fork.

Sprinkle with sesame seeds and green onion. Serve over fried or steamed rice with vegetables.

Makes two servings.

Recipe adapted from: My Little Gourmet

Read Full Post »

Thanks to everyone who entered the drawing in our very first giveaway! You guys look good in green. :)

Thanks to everyone who entered the drawing in our very first giveaway! You guys look good in green. :)

"The Laurel's House Bread Book"

The prize: “The Laurel’s House Bread Book”

This giveaway thing is fun, huh?

We drew the cutoff for entries this afternoon and were very pleased with the small pile we received. Several people had more than one card in the bowl, which definitely makes things interesting.

Thanks again to those of you who participated!

Are you ready to see who won this lovely vintage bread cookbook?

Drum roll, please!

*

*

*

*

*

Sara, lover of croissants, you are the winner! Congratulations!

Sara, lover of croissants, you are the winner! Congratulations!

Sara, please email your mailing address to us at dkscooks@gmail.com, and we’ll send the cookbook your way as soon as possible!

Thanks again, guys! Would you like to see more giveaways in the future?

Read Full Post »

by Caitlin Saniga

Roasted garlic soup

This soup was smooth, creamy, garlicky and beautifully aromatic, thanks to the bay leaf and white wine. For leftovers, I added a big scoop of rice and some steamed asparagus, which made it into almost a risotto and was also terrific.

  • 1 large garlic head, whole, unpeeled
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 cup finely chopped onion
  • 3/4 cup finely chopped carrot
  • 1 medium potato, peeled and cubed
  • 3 cups chicken stock
  • 1/4 cup dry white wine
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream
  • 1/2 cup finely grated fresh Parmesan cheese
  • chopped scallion, for garnish

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Using a serrated knife, cut the top off the garlic head so that the tip of each clove is exposed. Place the garlic on a piece of aluminum foil and drizzle with 1 tablespoon of olive oil. Add the bay leaf and fold the foil to form a packet. Place the packet in the oven and bake for 40 minutes. Cool slightly. In a small bowl, squeeze the garlic head until all of the roasted flesh is released. Discard the outer husks the bay leaf.

In a large heavy-duty saucepan, heat the remaining olive oil and butter, add onions, and cook over medium heat until translucent, about 4 minutes. Add the carrots and continue to cook for 5 more minutes. Add the minced garlic and cook for 2 minutes. Stir in the potato, chicken stock, white wine, roasted garlic, salt, and pepper. Cover and bring the soup to a boil. Reduce heat to medium low and continue to cook for 35 minutes.
Using a blender, purée the soup in small batches until smooth. Return the soup to the saucepan over medium heat and whisk in the heavy cream. Heat until warmed. Do not boil. Keep warm until ready to serve.
In a large pan over medium heat, drop Parmesan by the rounded tablespoonful into 4 separate clumps. Cook undisturbed until the cheese crisps up and turns golden-brown. Transfer the pan to the fridge, placing a hot pad underneath, and let cool for 2 minutes. Dab the cheese crisps with a paper towel to remove any excess oil.
Ladle the soup into 4 bowls. Place a cheese crisp on the surface of each bowl of soup. Garnish with chopped scallions. Serve warm.

Recipe adapted from: Country Living

Read Full Post »

"The Laurel House Bread Book"

Have you been loving our On the Rise guide this month? Then you’d probably enjoy this copy of “The Laurel’s Kitchen Bread Book,” which includes many more bread recipes than we’ll ever be able to provide. Read on to find out how you could win it.

In the warm and generous spirit of our bread guide this month, we’ve decided to start a new feature on the blog: giveaways!

The book is in as good of shape as a book from 1984 could be. The pages are clean, and the illustrations are as wonderful as ever. Here's a look at book's first page.

The book is in as good of shape as a book from 1984 could be. The pages are clean, and the illustrations are as wonderful as ever.

The first of our prizes ties in closely with the bread guide’s theme. Caitlin happened upon a retro copy of “The Laurel’s Kitchen Bread Book” during a recent trip to a used book sale in Roanoke and fell in love with the quirky illustrations that dot the pages of the book. Inside this 1984 edition’s 447 pages are recipes for a variety of breads, including loaves, quick breads, bagels, biscuits, rolls and more.

Each recipe provides detailed instructions.

Each recipe provides detailed instructions.

Authors Laurel Robertson, Carol Flinders and Bronwen Godfrey also spend a good portion of the beginning of the book explaining bread basics in detail, such as methods for adjusting dough consistency, kneading, letting the dough rise, checking for doneness and more. A description on Amazon calls this book “the classic bestselling cookbook devoted to baking light, healthful, delicious bread entirely from whole grains.” It seems like a great bread guide for beginners and experts alike.

And we want to share it with you!

How the giveaway works:

You’ll have until noon on Monday to enter for chances to win the cookbook. At that point, we’ll use a drawing to pick a random winner, and we’ll announce the winner in a new blog post later that day. That winner will need to email us with their mailing address so we can send along their prize.

Ways to win:

  • What’s your favorite type of bread? Leave your answer as a comment on this post, and you’ll be entered in the drawing once.
  • Share our Facebook post about this giveaway on your own Facebook account, and you’ll be entered in the drawing once more.
  • Retweet our tweet about this giveaway, and you’ll be entered in the drawing once again.

That means you could have up to 3 entries.

Any questions? Good luck!

Read Full Post »

by Sarah Steimer

I love a nice, light sandwich for lunch, and these two don't require many ingredients and hardly any time. Cut off the crusts and slice into smaller bites and you also have some great tea sandwiches.

I love a nice, light bite for breakfast or lunch, and these two don’t require many ingredients and hardly any time. Cut off the crusts and slice into smaller bites and you also have some great tea sandwiches.

For the radish and scallions over Greek yogurt:

For each sandwich, use one piece of bread. Spread each piece of bread with about 2-3 tablespoons plain Greek yogurt. Top with one small, thinly sliced radish and one scallion, sliced on an extreme angle. Sprinkle with fresh crushed pepper.

For the apple with cinnamon over ricotta:

For each sandwich, use one piece of bread. Spread each piece of bread with about 2-3 tablespoons ricotta and sprinkle with ground cinnamon. Top with 1/4 of an apple, such as a Gala, sliced thin. Sprinkle again with cinnamon.

Recipes adapted from: Bon Appetit here and here

Read Full Post »

by Caitlin Saniga

Rye bread

In all, this beautiful rye bread takes about 2 1/2 hours to make. Don’t be alarmed when you pull a dark brown loaf out of the oven at the end. That’s the exact color the crust should be! Once mine cooled off, I used the slices to make simple buttered toast with eggs for breakfast and grilled cheese with with dill pickles for lunch.

  • 1 1/4-ounce envelope active dry yeast
  • 1 1/8 cup warm water (110 degrees)
  • 2 tablespoons honey plus 1 teaspoon honey
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted, plus more for bowl and pans
  • 1 1/4 cup rye flour
  • 2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for surface and dusting
  • 2 teaspoons coarse salt
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon caraway seeds
  • 1 egg white

Sprinkle the yeast over 1/4 cup water. Add 1 teaspoon of honey. Whisk until the yeast dissolves. Let stand until foamy, about 5 minutes. Transfer to the bowl of a mixer fitted with the paddle or dough-hook attachment. Add the butter and remaining water and 2 tablespoons honey. In a separate bowl, whisk the flour with the salt; add 1 1/2 cups to the yeast. Mix on a low speed until smooth. Mix in 1 tablespoon of caraway seeds. Add remaining the 2 cups flour, a bit at a time, mixing until the dough comes away from the sides of the bowl and forms a ragged, slightly sticky ball. Butter a large bowl.

Prepare a small pan of boiling water. Meanwhile, knead the dough on a floured surface until smooth and elastic but still slightly tacky, about 5 minutes. Shape into a ball. Transfer to the prepared bowl and cover with kitchen towel.

Place the boiling water on a low oven rack. Place the bowl of dough on a rack above. Close the oven door and let stand until the dough doubles in volume, about 1 hour.

Butter and flour a 4 1/2-8 1/2-inch loaf pan. On a flowered surface, punch down the dough and shape it into an 8 1/2-inch-long rectangle, about 1/2 inch thick. Fold the long sides of the dough toward the center, overlapping slightly. Press the seam to seal. Transfer the dough, seam side down, to the pan. Prepare an egg wash by whisking in 1 teaspoon water with the egg white. Brush the top of the loaf with egg wash and sprinkle with 1 teaspoon caraway seeds.  Drape the loaf with a kitchen towel and place on top of the oven. Let stand  until dough rises about 1 inch above the top of the pan, about 45 minutes. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Bake until the top of the loaf is golden brown, about 40 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack to cool slightly, then turn out the loaf. Let cool completely before slicing.

Recipe adapted from: MarthaStewart.com

*We’re loving the smell of fresh bread wafting from our ovens in February. See all of our On the Rise bread recipes here.

Read Full Post »

by Sarah Steimer

Our neighborhood here in Chicago - Andersonville - has tons and tons of great places to eat. But honestly, what's better than a good old-fashioned deli up the street?

Our neighborhood here in Chicago – Andersonville – has tons and tons of great places to eat in various price ranges, styles and cuisines. But at the end of the day, what’s better than a good old-fashioned deli up the street?

I visited: JB’s Deli, which makes it very clear that it is “One of a few Jewish delis” (according to at least two signs and its website). The deli shares a space with Gordono Pharmacy, which is in the back of the store. I love the interior, it has all these cool, old-school design features such as tin ceiling tiles, exposed brick, retro lights and hexagon floor tiles. There are only a few seats out front, but there’s extra seating in the back. If you hit the deli around lunchtime, you can catch lots of regulars filing in and out for their sandwiches.

It’s like the mullet of stores: Business in the front… pharmacy in the back?

I tried: A pumpernickel bagel with vegetable schmear, a small side of egg salad and a can of ginger ale (I never drink pop, but this felt right).

Why it stood out: Are you kidding me? It’s a Jewish deli — which means you’re likely going to get a pretty fantastic bagel and/or pastrami sandwich. This bagel/schmear combination is my go-to at JB’s. Even at noon the bagels still taste pretty fresh, and the schmear is probably my all-time favorite. The egg salad, I will say, was just eh.

It cost: For the bagel, side and drink, a grand total of $5.98 (right under the bell!).

Find out more:

JB’s Deli, Inc.

5501 N Clark St
Chicago, IL 60640
I've also had a couple of sandwiches (turkey and pastrami - delish), but next on my list to try is the chili.

I’ve also had a couple of sandwiches at the deli (turkey and pastrami – delish), but next on my list to try is the chili.

*$6 Snacks is a recurring feature that reviews an area eatery’s snack — for $6 or less. Look at a map of the places we’ve tried. Help our map grow by submitting your own review. Find out how!

J.B.'S Deli on Urbanspoon

Read Full Post »

by Caitlin Saniga

Carne asada lettuce wraps with guacamole and red cabbage

There’s a little Mexican restaurant in downtown Roanoke called Alejandro’s that serves what the menu calls “Shorty Tacos” (Stay tuned. There may be a $6 Snack review of those delicious tacos yet!), which are tiny corn tortillas filled with chili-lime marinated steak, pico de gallo and guacamole. It’s one of mine and Eddie’s favorite dishes in Roanoke. So for his birthday, I decided to do a spin on our beloved shorty tacos by making them fresh at home — and turning them into lettuce wraps! I set out all of the ingredients in separate bowls, and we had so much fun trying different variations at the table. What a happy memory!

Carne asada:

  • 1/3 cup fresh lime juice (from 3 or 4 small limes)
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 sweet onion cut into small chunks
  • 1 2-pound beef rump roast
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced

Lettuce wraps:

  • 1 large head Bibb or Boston lettuce, leaves removed, rinsed and patted dry
  • chopped Roma tomatoes
  • shredded red cabbage
  • chopped cilantro
  • sour cream
  • guacamole
  • lime wedges, for garnish

In small bowl, beat lime juice, oil, vinegar, cumin, paprika, chili powder, cayenne, salt and pepper.

Place the chopped onion in the bottom of a slow cooker. Place the beef over onion. Pour the lime juice mixture over the beef. Sprinkle the garlic over top.

Cover and cook on Low heat for 8 to 9 hours.

Using 2 forks, shred the beef. Stir well to mix the beef with the sauce.

Place all lettuce wrap ingredients on separate serving dishes so everyone can customize their wraps. Generally, though, place a small amount of beef in the center of a lettuce leaf. Add various toppings, roll the leaf around the toppings and eat.

Serves 8.

Carne asada recipe adapted from: Betty Crocker

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 436 other followers