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by Caitlin Saniga

Herbal balsamic vinaigrette

I serve this dressing drizzled over fresh beet greens, roasted beets, and toasted walnuts. Use whatever herbs you have — dill, mint and tarragon might also be nice.

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by Caitlin Saniga

Carrot ginger dressing

This carrot ginger dressing looks and tastes striking with fresh greens, shaved zucchini, edamame, you name it.

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by Caitlin Saniga

Sweet potato balls with smoky cashew aioli

Aioli is a sauce traditionally made with olive, oil, lemon, garlic and egg yolks, but this one’s a little different in that it includes softened raw cashews instead of egg yolks. Plus, smoked paprika is like magic pixie dust. Don’t skimp and grab for regular paprika. Buy a little bottle of the smoked version, and I promise you won’t regret it. I’ll be looking for new ways to incorporate it, so stay tuned. My first experiment was to add it to hummus — delicious!

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by Sarah Steimer

I've made this bread a few times now and haven't been disappointed yet.

I’ve made this bread a few times now and haven’t been disappointed yet. I like to make up the dough right before bed and let it sit overnight. This recipe doesn’t require much hassle, just patience.

  • 1 1/2 cups wheat flour
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon instant or rapid-rise yeast
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons table salt
  • 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons water at room temperature
  • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons mild-flavored lager (I used Harp)
  • 1 tablespoon white vinegar

Whisk together the flour, yeast and salt in a large bowl. Add the water, beer and vinegar. Use a spatula to gently fold the dry ingredients

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Bread might seem like kind of a big deal, but you probably have most of the ingredients in your home right now. Don’t have a Dutch oven? Ask around, chances are someone you know has one you could borrow. Plus, using the parchment paper pretty much guarantees you’ll get it back to them as clean as you got it.

together until a shaggy ball forms. Cover the bowl with a towel and let sit at room temperature — away from any drafts — for 8 to 18 hours.

Place a 12-by-18-inch sheet of parchment paper inside of a 10-inch skillet and lightly spray or brush the paper with oil. Set aside.

Working on a lightly floured surface, knead the dough 10-15 times. Shape the dough into a ball by tucking the edges underneath. Place the dough, seam-side down, on the parchment-covered skillet and spray or brush the dough with oil. Cover the dough loosely with plastic wrap and let rise at room temperature for about 2 hours, or until the dough has doubled in size.

About 30 minutes before baking, place a Dutch oven with its lid into the oven and preheat to 425 degrees. NOTE: Make sure you check what your Dutch oven’s maximum temperature — particularly the lid’s handle. If your Dutch oven can only withstand heat up to 400 degrees, reduce to 400 instead of 425.

Remove the plastic wrap from the dough. Dust a little all-purpose flour on the top of the dough and use a sharp knife to one 6-inch long, 1/2-inch deep slit along the top of the dough.

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The first time I made this bread, Bill asked if we could open a sandwich shop. Because the clear next move after making one loaf of bread in a Dutch oven is opening your own business. I can’t say I didn’t think about it…

Carefully remove the pot from the oven. Pick the dough up by the parchment paper and place into the Dutch oven, allowing the paper to overhang a bit. Place the lid on the pot and return to the oven. Bake, covered, for 30 minutes. Remove the lid from the pot and bake for an additional 15 minutes, or until the bread is golden brown and makes a hollow sound when you knock on the bread.

Remove the bread from the Dutch oven using the parchment paper. Let the bread cool on a wire rack for about 2 hours, or until room temperature.

Makes one loaf of bread.

Recipe adapted from: Cooks Illustrated via Erin Cooks

*We’re loving the smell of fresh bread wafting from our ovens in February. See all of our On the Rise bread recipes here.

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by Sarah Steimer

I enjoyed my grapefruit sour with a handful of spicy peanuts --- a little salute to the south.

I paired my grapefruit sour with a handful of spicy peanuts — so Southern. By the way, my drink may look darker than yours. The honey I used is a very dark buckwheat honey.

  • juice from 1 grapefruit, strained
  • 4 ounces bourbon
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1/2 cup water
  • ice

In a small sauce pan, combine the honey and water and whisk over medium-low heat until the honey has dissolved. Bring the mixture to a boil and remove from heat to cool.

Combine the bourbon and grapefruit juice and shake with ice. NOTE: If you do not have a cocktail shaker, just stir the mixture around with the ice in a bowl on shake up in a jar with a lid. Add the honey simple syrup to taste.

Strain the drink into a glass over additional ice and serve.

Makes about 2-3 servings.

Recipe adapted from: Marcus Samuelsson

*We’re taking advantage of the winter citrus season (and healthy New Year’s resolutions) during the month of January. Look for six drink recipes focused on lemons, limes, grapefruits, oranges and more. Find all the Fresh-squeezed recipes here.

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by Sarah Steimer

Freshest juice ever! I juiced and strained everything one evening when I had free time and stored the citrus juices and pomegranate juice separately. You could just mix the pomegranate juice in the same pitcher as the citrus, but I like how it settles toward the bottom when added right before serving.

Freshest juice ever! I juiced and strained everything one evening when I had free time and stored the citrus juices and pomegranate juice separately. You could mix the pomegranate juice in the same pitcher as the citrus, but I like how the pom settles toward the bottom when added right before serving.

  • 2 pomegrantes OR about 1 1/2 cups pomegranate juice
  • 2 grapefruits
  • 2 oranges (I used navel oranges)
  • 2 tangerines OR mineola tangelos
  • 1/2 lime

    I sort of expected pomegranate juice to require some extravagant extraction that only machines or very patient humans could do. Instead it's just seed, blend and strain.

    I sort of expected pomegranate juice to require some extravagant extraction that only machines or very patient humans could do. Instead it’s just seed, blend and strain.

If you choose to make your own pomegranate juice, simply seed the fruits and rinse. Add the pomegranate seeds to a blender and puree for only a couple of seconds; pureeing too long will create a cloudy juice. Pour the blended seeds through a fine mesh strainer, using a spatula to extract as much juice as possible. Set the pomegranate juice aside.

Juice the citrus fruits and pour through a fine mesh strainer to remove any pulp or seeds.

Divide the citrus juice among three glasses, adding the pomegranate juice last so it can settle toward the bottom.

Makes about three servings.

Recipe adapted from: Martha Stewart

*We’re taking advantage of the winter citrus season (and healthy New Year’s resolutions) during the month of January. Look for six drink recipes focused on lemons, limes, grapefruits, oranges and more. Find all the Fresh-squeezed recipes here.

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by Sarah Steimer

I would definitely place this biscotti in the after-dinner category, with either coffee or black tea.

I would definitely place this biscotti in the after-dinner category, with either coffee or black tea.

  • 1/3 vegetable or canola oil
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • 1/4 cup molasses
  • 2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon pumpkin pie spice
  • 1 tablespoon ground star anise (I couldn’t find ground star anise, so I had to ground my own whole pieces. It was a joy.)
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 1 cup white chocolate chips for melting

Combine the oil, sugar, eggs and molasses. In another bowl, whisk together the flours, baking powder and spices. Mix the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients with a wooden spoon to form a stiff dough.

Divide the dough in half and shape each half into rolls the length of a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Pat the rolls down to flatten to about a 1/2-inch thickness.

I definitely had some fun with the decorating, and it the chocolate is easier to control than I expected.

I definitely had some fun with the decorating, and the chocolate is easier to control than I expected.

Bake the biscotti at 375 degrees for 25 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool for a few minutes.

Cut the biscotti into 1/2-inch thick diagonal slices. Return the biscotti to the baking sheet and bake for another 5 to 7 minutes, laying cut-side up.

Melt the white chocolate in a double boiler or in a microwave. Pour the melted chocolate into a baggie and cut a tiny corner off one end of the baggie to pipe over the biscotti.

Makes about four dozen biscotti.

Recipe adapted from: A New Bloom

*During the month of December, we’re offering some simple biscotti recipes that can be quickly snatched for breakfast with coffee or enjoyed with tea after a long day of holiday preparation. All of our Crunch Time recipes can be found here.

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