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Posts Tagged ‘baguette’

by Caitlin Saniga

Mushrooms always reduce in size when they cook. This recipe could easily be doubled for larger portions or for larger parties.

Mushrooms always reduce in size when they cook. This recipe could easily be doubled for larger portions or for larger parties.

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by Caitlin Saniga

Strawberry and whipped mascarpone crostini

You’ve probably had strawberries and whipped cream before. But mascarpone cheese adds another level of luxury to the classic combination. Paired with the crusty, buttered toasts, it almost reminds me of an airier strawberry cheesecake.

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by Caitlin Saniga

Crostini with hummus and spinach-olive slaw

This is a no-fuss crostini that’s sure to impress. Prepare your own hummus or use your favorite store-bought version. We won’t tell!

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by Sarah Steimer

I'm sort of new to the radish game, and I definitely have learned to appreciate them this spring. Mostly, I love the color and bite they gives simple dishes.

I’m sort of new to the radish game, and I definitely have learned to appreciate them this spring. Mostly, I love the color and bite they give simple dishes.

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by Sarah Steimer

I love artichoke hearts and I feel like they're overlooked among spring veggies. Artichoke hearts have such a great bite of juiciness that work great on something like a simple crostini.

I love artichoke hearts and I feel like they’re overlooked among spring veggies. Artichoke hearts have such a great bite of juiciness that work great on something like a simple crostini.

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by Caitlin Saniga

Crostini with roasted garlic-pea puree, asparagus and pine nuts

These pretty little crostini bites were bursting with spring flavor, and they were a snap to whip up.

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by Sarah Steimer

My baguettes didn't wind up looking quite as sexy as the photos from the original recipe - but they taste and texture was pretty near spot-on for a baguette. I had to make a few tweaks because I don't have a bread stone, but I think the baguettes turned out pretty darn well overall.

My baguettes didn’t wind up looking quite as sexy as the photos from the original recipe — but the taste and texture was pretty darn near spot-on for a baguette. I had to make a few tweaks to the recipe overall: I used an upside-down baking sheet in place of a bread stone and a Dutch oven with ice to create steam instead of a cast iron skillet. I don’t think my tweaks made a huge difference, but learning to bake your own bread involves a lot of trial and error. It takes some time to learn how to knead the dough just right or to figure out the perfect amount of time the bread needs to bake, but you won’t get too many complaints from those who benefit from your experiments.

  • 1 1/2 cups tap water, heated to 115 degrees
  • 1 teaspoon dry active yeast
  • 3 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • oil
  • 1/2 cup ice cubes

Whisk together the yeast and water in a large bowl. Let sit for about 10 minutes, or until the yeast is foamy. Stir the flour in with a fork until dough forms and all the flour is absorbed. Let the dough sit for about 20 minutes so the flour may fully hydrate.

Add the salt to the dough and transfer to a lightly floured surface. Knead the dough for about 10 minutes, or until smooth and elastic. I needed to add additional flour to my surface pretty regularly because the dough was fairly sticky. Just try not to add TOO much flour!

Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Place the bowl in a cold oven and let rest until doubled in size, about 45 minutes.

Working on a lightly floured surface, form the dough into an 8-inch-by-6-inch rectangle. Fold the 8-inch sides toward the middle so the edges meet. Next, fold the 6-inch sides toward the center so those edges meet. Return to the bowl, seam side down, and place in the oven for 1 hour.

Place the dough on a lightly floured surface and cut into three equal pieces. Shape each piece into a 14-inch rope. Place a piece of lightly floured parchment paper on an upside-down baking sheet. Transfer the dough to the parchment. Lift and crease the paper between the ropes to form long pleats. Place two tightly rolled kitchen towels under the long edges of the paper to support the loaves. Cover the dough loosely with plastic wrap and let rise for 50 minutes.

While the dough is rising, place a cast iron skillet on the bottom rack of the oven. Place a baking stone on the rack above the skillet. I do not have a baking stone, so I used an upside-down baking sheet instead. Pre-heat the oven to 475 degrees.

Once the oven is ready, remove the plastic wrap and towels from the dough. Flatten out the paper so the loaves are spaced out. Use a sharp knife or razor to slash the top of each loaf at a 30-degree angle in four spots, with each slash about 4 inches long. Use the edges of the parchment to carefully guide the loaves onto the hot baking stone (this is a good time to have a friend help). Place the ice cubes in the skillet so steam forms, thus allowing the loaves to rise fully before a crust forms.

Bake until the loaves are dark brown and crisp, about 30 minutes. Cool before serving.

Makes three, 14-inch baguettes.

Recipe adapted from: Saveur

*We’re loving the smell of fresh bread wafting from our ovens in February. See all of our On the Rise bread recipes here.

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by Sarah Steimer

This is one of my favorite bruschettas to make on a whim. I always have balsamic vinegar, a basil plant and tomatoes in the summer. I also don’t have to think about the mozzarella, Bill makes a bee-line to the cheese sellers at the farmer’s market every week.

  • 2 cups grape or cherry tomatoes, halved or quartered
  • 1 ball of fresh mozzarella, cubed or torn
  • 1/4 cup basil leaves, torn
  • 3-4 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1 small baguette or another hard-crusted bread, sliced

Combine the tomatoes, mozzarella, basil and vinegar in a bowl. For the best flavors, let the mixture sit in the refrigerator for about an hour.

Bruschetta works well as an appetizer, but also as a quick side dish for dinner.

Serve the mixture, cold, over the bread.

Makes about 3 cups of bruschetta mixture.

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by Sarah Steimer

I never thought about honey and tomatoes together. I'll have to see what else is possible along those lines.

  • olive oil
  • 1 garlic clove minced
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 1 cup cherry tomatoes, quartered
  • pepper
  • 1 jalapeno, chopped
  • 4 basil leaves torn into bite-size pieces
  • 1 red onion thinly sliced
  • 1/2 baguette, sliced into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1 avocado halved, peeled, pitted, and sliced – toast if you so please
  • salt

Add oil to saute pan and cook garlic until translucent. Add tomatoes and honey and bring to a simmer, cooking for about five minutes. Turn off the heat and rush the tomatoes with a fork.

In a small bowl, toss the basil, jalapeno, onions, salt and pepper. Add the tomato mixture to this.

Place the avocado slices on the baguettes (about two or thee on each, depending on how thin you sliced). Top with the tomato, basil and onion mixture.

Makes about 20 pieces.

Recipe adapted from: Cookstr

Photo: Sarah Steimer

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by Sarah Steimer

Bill and I had guests over one night, but the extreme evening heat made me rethink my oven appetizer. I threw these together last minute.

  • 1/2 baguette, sliced into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 8 ounces goat cheese

For the rhubarb compote:

  • 3 cups 1/2-inch pieces fresh rhubarb
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1/2 lemon

In a medium sauce pan, combine the rhubarb, lemon juice and sugar. Stir over medium heat until sugar dissolves. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until rhubarb is tender, stirring occasionally, about 7 minutes. (I made this the day before for a different recipe and had it chilled.)

For a while our farmer's market basically just had piles of asparagus and rhubarb.

For the candied walnuts

  • 1/4 cup of sugar
  • pinch of salt
  • 1/2 cup of walnuts

In a saute pan, combine the sugar and salt over low heat. Stirring occasionally, let the sugar melt down until it resembles a brown sauce. Toss the walnuts in and mix quickly until coated. Pour the candied walnuts on a piece of wax or parchment paper and pull apart with forks (melted sugar is HOT, avoid touching it). Let cool completely.

Place about a tablespoon of goat cheese on each piece of bread. Top with rhubarb compote and a walnut or two.

Makes about 2o servings.

Recipe (or idea, I suppose): Sarah Steimer

Rhubarb compote recipe: Epicurious

Candied walnuts recipe: Chicagoist

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