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Posts Tagged ‘bay leaf’

by Sarah Steimer

Fennel and carrot soup

The deep flavors of this soup could almost be mistaken for a bit of bacon fat or another meat product, but it all stems from slowly cooking the vegetables. Even the browned butter walnuts add another layer of depth to this very simple soup. The cream wouldn’t be totally necessary, but it’s certainly a nice touch (especially with that maple syrup).

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by Sarah Steimer

Compared with my other salads, this was definitely the most tame. Although it wasn't as jazzy as the other salads, I really enjoyed the soft flavors from the spices and the sweet raisins that are all plumped up because they simmer with the rice and spices.

Compared with my other salads, this was definitely the most tame. Although it wasn’t as jazzy as the other salads, I really enjoyed the soft flavors from the spices and the sweet raisins that are all plumped up because they simmer with the rice and spices. This salad would be best paired with something else, and I’m considering picking up some salmon to go with my leftovers.


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by Sarah Steimer

These are to die for. The onions are sweet, yet savory. The au jus is definitely optional. It’s good with or without.

  • 1 large sweet onions, cut into quarters then sliced thin
  • 1/2 tablespoon butter
  • 1/2 tablespoon olive oil (neither this nor the butter need to be exact)
  • salt and pepper
  • 1/2 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • leaves from 3-4 springs thyme (or about 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme)
  • 1 small dried bay leaf
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/4 cup beef OR vegetable broth (if you want to go legitimately vegetarian)
  • 1/4 cup finely shredded mozzarella cheese

    If you want to make these ahead, you can freeze them after you fold and seal them. Just place them on a baking sheet (not touching) until they freeze. Then place them in a well-sealed bag or other container and place them back in the freezer. When you’re ready to cook them, you don’t even have to worry about letting them thaw.

  • 10-12 wonton wrappers

Heat a medium-to-large sauté pan. When warm, add the butter and oil. Let the butter melt before adding the onions. Stir the onions so they are coated in the butter and oil, then add the Worcestershire sauce, thyme, bay leaf (be careful not to crush the bay leaf, you do not want pieces of it in your food), sugar and broth.

Turn the heat up to high to bring the liquid to a boil. Bring the heat back down to medium and let the liquid cook off and the onions caramelize — about 20 minutes.

Remove the onions from the heat and discard the bay leaf. Let the onions mostly cool before tossing the onions in the mozzarella.

Lay out the wonton wrappers. Working one at a time, wet the edges of the wrappers with water and spoon about a tablespoon’s worth of the onion-cheese mixture in each. Fold over to make a triangle and seal the edges well.

Continue until all the wontons are made.

Heat more olive oil in a pan, just enough to cover the bottom. Add the wontons to the pan so they are sitting up on the folded edge, with one corner straight up in the air — not laying on their side. Let the bottoms brown. Add enough water to cover about 1/3 of the wontons and cover the pan. Let the wontons steam for about 2-3 minutes.

Remove the lid and let the water cook out while the wontons crisp back up a bit on the bottom. Remove the wontons with a spatula (they may stick a little, but I didn’t have much trouble).

For the au jus:

  • 1/2 cup beef broth
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 clove garlic, minced

Combine all ingredients and heat in the microwave for about 30 seconds. Serve with the warm wontons.

Makes 10-12 wontons.

Recipe adapted from: Iowa Girl Eats

* Want One? is our October guide that pays homage to the wonton, a traditionally steamed, fried, baked or boiled dumpling that can be filled with an array of goodies. We’ll feature meatless, meat-full and dessert renditions.

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by Sarah Steimer

I made the full recipe so Bill and I could eat it throughout the week. I noticed him break some tortilla chips in it one day, so I assume that’s a good upgrade if you’re looking for one. This is a vegan recipe, FYI.

  • 4 cups low-sodium vegetable broth/stock
  • 2 (14.5 oz) cans low-sodium fire roasted diced tomatoes
  • olive oil
  • 1 medium red onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 poblano pepper
  • 1 red bell pepper
  • 1 jalapeno, seeds and ribs removed for less spice
  • 1 cup dry quinoa
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon chipotle sauce (if you don’t have it, you can skip it or use hot sauce instead)
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 2 bay leaves
  • pinch ground cinnamon
  • 1 avocado, cut into 1/2 inch cubes (optional)

Roast, peel and chop the poblano and red peppers. (see Caitlin’s video if you need a how-to)

Heat a dutch oven or heavy, large pot over medium heat. Add enough olive oil just to cover the bottom and, once heated, add the onions. Cook the onions, stirring occasionally, until they have caramelized. Every once in awhile you may have to de-glaze the pan (keep the onions from sticking) by adding a little of the vegetable broth.

While the onions are cooking, combine the quinoa and 2 cups of water in a sauce pan. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for about 30 minutes or until all water is absorbed. Remove from heat and set aside.

Add the remaining vegetable both to the dutch oven, along with the tomatoes, garlic, jalapeno, poblano, red bell pepper, chili powder, coriander, cumin, bay leaves, cinnamon and chipotle sauce. Bring everything to a boil (you may need to put the lid on for this, that’s a lot of liquid to get boiling). Reduce the heat and let the soup simmer for about 25 minutes, uncovered and stirring occasionally.

Remove the bay leaves and add the cooked quinoa. Mix well and serve, topped with the cubed avocado.

Makes about six servings.

Recipe adapted from: Prevention RD

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by Sarah Steimer

Because the chorizo itself is fairly spicy and salty, make sure not to add much (if any) additional salt. You could also use less than a pound of the meat if you'd rather have more vegetables or beans.

  • 1 pound ground chorizo – OR – 1 pound chorizo sausages, cases removed
  • olive oil
  • 1 large carrot, sliced in half and cut into half-moons
  • 1/2 large onion
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 1 can diced tomatoes
  • 2 cups water
  • dried oregano
  • bay leaf

Cook the chorizo in a sauté pan until fully cooked. The meat may appear a little pink, but that’s likely from the chorizo seasoning. Drain the fat/oil from the pan.

In a dutch oven or sturdy pot, heat a few teaspoons of olive oil. Once hot, add the carrots, onion and garlic. Sauté for about 5 minutes or until the onions are translucent. Add the chorizo, chickpeas, tomatoes and oregano, stirring to incorporate. Add the 2 cups of water and stir, adding the bay leaf to the water (keep it where you can see it).

Bring the stew to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cover for 30 minutes.

Before serving, remove the bay leaf from the soup.

Makes 6 servings.

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