Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘blood oranges’

by Caitlin Saniga

Blood orange float

The French vanilla ice cream gives this drink a sweet old-timey feel. But raspberry, pineapple or lemon sorbet would be fun to try. And honey adds sweetness to the naturally tart blood orange juice. If you wanted, you could switch the club soda for ginger ale or lemon-lime soda, too.

  • 3 medium blood oranges
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 2 cups club soda
  • French vanilla ice cream
It seems to me that the darker the pulp of the blood orange is, the sweeter it is too. Mine were a nice balance of sweet and tart with lots of citrusy flavor.

It seems to me that the darker the pulp of the blood orange is, the sweeter it is too. Mine were a nice balance of sweet and tart with lots of citrusy flavor.

Scrub the peels of the blood oranges, and then slice 4 garnishing wedges from one orange. Set aside.

Juice the rest of the oranges with a fork, press or juicer, then pass the juice through a fine mesh sieve to remove the pulp.

In a glass container, combine the orange juice and honey and microwave for about 1 minute (or long enough to soften the honey).

Even after running my blood orange juice through the sieve several times, a few flecks of pulp remained. No harm, though!

Even after running my blood orange juice through the sieve several times, a few flecks of pulp remained. No harm, though!

Use a whisk to blend the juice and honey together. Chill the juice for 30 minutes.

Divide the juice among four tall glasses. Then divide the club soda between the glasses. Add a scoop of ice cream to each glass, then garnish with orange wedges. Serve with straws and spoons.

Makes 4.

*We’re taking advantage of the winter citrus season (and healthy New Year’s resolutions) during the month of January. Look for six drink recipes focused on lemons, limes, grapefruits, oranges and more. Find all the Fresh-squeezed recipes here.

Read Full Post »

by Caitlin Saniga

The most beautiful colors

Someone recently told me that his guiding principle for cooking is: “Cook with color.” I love that idea! (My favorite color is rainbow.) And this dish, to me, is what that motto is about. I picked beautiful, colorful ingredients and put them together in a bowl. The greens I chose provided a variegated base of pale green, grass green and pinky-purple. The pistachios added bright green, brown and more hints of purple. The pomegranate seeds (which have always reminded me of rubies) added a pop of deep red. And last but not least, the blood orange dressing was the most beautiful rosy gold color. Together, it’s a feast for your senses!

If you haven't worked with blood oranges before, like I hadn't, it's good to know that the coloration of the flesh and juice can vary greatly between fruits. The inside of the oranges I chose looked similar to the color of grapefruit with streaks of crimson. The juice was a deep pink color. Other blood oranges can be solid pink, to solid red to almost black. And the flavor tends to be florally sweet, with a hint of grapefruitlike bitterness.

If you haven’t worked with blood oranges before, like I hadn’t, it’s good to know that the coloration of the flesh and juice can vary greatly between fruits. The inside of the oranges I chose looked similar to the color of grapefruit with streaks of crimson. The juice was a deep pink color. Other blood oranges can be solid pink, to solid red, to almost black. And the flavor tends to be florally sweet, with a hint of grapefruitlike bitterness.

Vinaigrette:

  • 1/2 cup blood orange juice (from one large orange)
  • 1 clove garlic, smashed, peeled and minced
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon sherry vinegar
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper

Salad:

  • 12 ounces torn greens (I used frisee, arugula and radicchio.)
  • 1 pomegranate, seeded (See a video I made on prepping pomegranates.)
  • 1 cup shelled pistachios (I used the roasted and salted type.)
The pomegranate I chose seemed almost perfect. The seeds were large and sweet and deep red. Some tips I picked up in the process: Look for a pomegranate with deep red, smooth skin (not pink) and no bruises or soft spots. And if you find one like this, use it within a day or two of purchasing.

The pomegranate I chose seemed almost perfect. The seeds were large and sweet and deep red. Some tips I picked up in the process: Look for a pomegranate with red, smooth skin (not pink) and no bruises or soft spots. And if you find one like this, use it within a day or two of purchasing.

To make the vinaigrette, whisk together all of the ingredients in a medium bowl.

Toss the torn greens in the vinaigrette, and divide the mixture among salad bowls. Top with pomegranate seeds and pistachios, and serve immediately to avoid wilting. If serving later, seal the vinaigrette in and airtight container and store in the fridge, separate from the greens and toppings.

Makes 4 servings.

Read Full Post »