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Posts Tagged ‘broth’

by Sarah Steimer

It totally bums me out that I can't easily compost at my apartment, so this was my little solution to that problem. On the day before our usual farmer's market trip, I went through the refrigerator and grabbed up all the vegetables that looked toward the end of their life. I also made sure to save some scraps from my prep during the week: corn cobs sans corn, broccoli stalks and onion stems.

My neighborhood just got a compost program! But before that, this was (and will continue to occasionally be) my vegetable scraps solution. On the day before our usual farmer’s market trip, I went through the refrigerator and grabbed up all the vegetables that looked toward the end of their life. I also made sure to save some scraps from my prep during the week: corn cobs sans corn, broccoli stalks and onion stems.


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by Caitlin Saniga

Holy comfort food! I’m sure I say this every time I make something in the slow cooker, but the smell of this stuff cooking all day was divine. Also, check out the awesome mini sourdough rolls I found at my grocery store’s bakery. They came partially baked, so I popped them in the oven for a few extra minutes to finish cooking. They tasted especially fresh. If you spot similar rolls at your grocery, I highly recommend them for these sandwiches!

  • 3-pound boneless beef roast
  • 1/3 cup low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 4 whole black peppercorns
  • 1 teaspoon dried rosemary
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 2 10-ounce cans beef broth
  • French rolls or hoagies
  • slices Provolone cheese
  • butter for rolls

Once the meat was finished cooking, I tried in vain to slice it into thin cuts, but it shredded on its own. The same will happen to you if you try to slice it warm. (Certainly not the end of the world!) I did find that when I used refrigerated leftovers the second time around, the cold meat sliced more easily.

Trim and discard all visible fat from the roast. Place the trimmed roast in a slow cooker.

In a medium bowl, combine the soy sauce, bay leaf, peppercorns, rosemary, thyme and garlic powder. Pour the mixture over the roast. Add the beef broth to the slow cooker. Cover, and cook on Low heat for about 5-6 hours, or until meat is very tender.

When the meat is ready to serve, slice and lightly slather the rolls with butter. Toast them in a 350-degree oven for 5 or so minutes. Remove the meat from the broth, reserving the broth. Thinly slice or shred the meat. Pile the meat on the rolls and top each roll with Provolone cheese. Place the rolls back in the oven for about 3 minutes or until cheese is melted.

Skim off any fat from the surface of the reserved broth in the slow cooker. Serve each sandwich with a small bowl of the reserved broth.

Makes about 8 servings.

Recipe adapted from: The Girl Who Ate Everything

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by Sarah Steimer

These are to die for. The onions are sweet, yet savory. The au jus is definitely optional. It’s good with or without.

  • 1 large sweet onions, cut into quarters then sliced thin
  • 1/2 tablespoon butter
  • 1/2 tablespoon olive oil (neither this nor the butter need to be exact)
  • salt and pepper
  • 1/2 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • leaves from 3-4 springs thyme (or about 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme)
  • 1 small dried bay leaf
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/4 cup beef OR vegetable broth (if you want to go legitimately vegetarian)
  • 1/4 cup finely shredded mozzarella cheese

    If you want to make these ahead, you can freeze them after you fold and seal them. Just place them on a baking sheet (not touching) until they freeze. Then place them in a well-sealed bag or other container and place them back in the freezer. When you’re ready to cook them, you don’t even have to worry about letting them thaw.

  • 10-12 wonton wrappers

Heat a medium-to-large sauté pan. When warm, add the butter and oil. Let the butter melt before adding the onions. Stir the onions so they are coated in the butter and oil, then add the Worcestershire sauce, thyme, bay leaf (be careful not to crush the bay leaf, you do not want pieces of it in your food), sugar and broth.

Turn the heat up to high to bring the liquid to a boil. Bring the heat back down to medium and let the liquid cook off and the onions caramelize — about 20 minutes.

Remove the onions from the heat and discard the bay leaf. Let the onions mostly cool before tossing the onions in the mozzarella.

Lay out the wonton wrappers. Working one at a time, wet the edges of the wrappers with water and spoon about a tablespoon’s worth of the onion-cheese mixture in each. Fold over to make a triangle and seal the edges well.

Continue until all the wontons are made.

Heat more olive oil in a pan, just enough to cover the bottom. Add the wontons to the pan so they are sitting up on the folded edge, with one corner straight up in the air — not laying on their side. Let the bottoms brown. Add enough water to cover about 1/3 of the wontons and cover the pan. Let the wontons steam for about 2-3 minutes.

Remove the lid and let the water cook out while the wontons crisp back up a bit on the bottom. Remove the wontons with a spatula (they may stick a little, but I didn’t have much trouble).

For the au jus:

  • 1/2 cup beef broth
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 clove garlic, minced

Combine all ingredients and heat in the microwave for about 30 seconds. Serve with the warm wontons.

Makes 10-12 wontons.

Recipe adapted from: Iowa Girl Eats

* Want One? is our October guide that pays homage to the wonton, a traditionally steamed, fried, baked or boiled dumpling that can be filled with an array of goodies. We’ll feature meatless, meat-full and dessert renditions.

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