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Posts Tagged ‘cookies’

by Sarah Steimer and Caitlin Saniga

Every year we like to pick a few cookies that are part of our yearly traditions, as well as a few newbies. As you’re likely in the middle of your own cookie-baking bonanza, we thought we’d share a few of our favorites from the past three years. And be sure to share some of your favorite recipes with us as well!

Classics

Some cookies don't fit into any other category except for classic must-haves.

Some cookies don’t fit into any other category except for classic must-haves.

Cut-outs

Put out the cookie cutters for this batch of desserts, you'll want to be in perfect form.

Pull out the cookie cutters for this batch of desserts, you’ll want to be in perfect form.

Drop cookies

There's very little flair required for drop cookies, but who says dessert requires finesse?

There’s very little flair required for drop cookies, but who says dessert requires finesse?

Shortbreads

Shortbread starts with a fairly simple base, but then gets jazzed up with some great add-ins or toppings.

Shortbread starts with a fairly simple base, but then gets jazzed up with some great add-ins or toppings.

Chocolate chip

C'mon, we really don't need to introduce the invisible chocolate chip cookie.

C’mon, we really don’t need to introduce the invisible chocolate chip cookie.

Slice cookies

Slice cookies just require some refrigeration time and a sharp knife.

Slice cookies just require some refrigeration time and a sharp knife.

Bar cookies

Not all cookies are created equal... or round.

Not all cookies are created equal… or round.

Biscotti

Translated to mean "twice-baked," these cookies can help start your holiday mornings.

Translated to mean “twice-baked,” these cookies can help start your holiday mornings.

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Here at So Hungry, we are gearing up for some serious cookie baking and fattening of friends, family and coworkers. We’re also putting together a great holiday cookie guide for you all to browse while putting together your own sugary menus! While your mouths water in anticipation, tell us…

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by Sarah Steimer

Witches' fingers

My mom would make these using a different recipe, so it was one of the first ideas that clicked in my head for Halloween desserts. You can use diluted red food coloring to paint the nails, or just keep them a natural brown as I did. And totally let the fingers wear some spider rings.

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by Caitlin Saniga | photos by Joel Hawksley

Pistachio gelato cookie sandwich from Sunshine Sammies in Asheville, N.C.

Pistachio gelato cookie sandwich from Sunshine Sammies in Asheville, N.C.


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by Sarah Steimer

Maple leaf cookies

I received nothing but great reviews on these cookies, and not just from Bill (who, for the record, doesn’t even really like sweets all that much). The original recipe called for topping with sanding sugar, but I opted for a simple cinnamon-sugar combo to boost the fall flavors and — more honestly — so I could avoid buying something extra.

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by Caitlin Saniga

Reasons these super-simple lemon bars rule: The cookie/lemon ratio is roughly 2:1, they're not overly sweet, and they're not too tart, either.

Reasons these super-simple lemon bars rule: The cookie/lemon filling ratio is roughly 2:1, they’re not overly sweet, and they’re not too tart, either.

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by Sarah Steimer

I've been eyeballing this recipe from The New York Times for quite a while. Chocolate chip might be my favorite cookie, and this recipe looked so perfected with its long rest time and fancy flours. The verdict: It ruled and I could have eaten a million. And an extra tip: If you don't eat these all pretty immediately, store them in a sealed container with a piece of bread, it helps the cookies stay moist.

I’ve been eyeballing this recipe from The New York Times for quite a while. Chocolate chip might be my favorite cookie, and this recipe looked so perfected with its long rest time and fancy flours. The verdict: It ruled. And an extra tip: If you don’t eat these all pretty immediately, store them in a sealed container with a piece of bread, it helps keep the cookies from going hard and stale.

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by Sarah Steimer

All of these cookies have the exact same amount of matcha, a Japanese green tea powder. I made this recipe twice and inadvertently bought a lighter-colored matcha, turning the second batch of cookies a very light green. In the end, I think the contrast ended up looking prettier on the plate than just one shade of green.

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by Caitlin Saniga

The secret to keeping these (decadent, delectable, divine!) cookies soft is transferring them to an airtight container no more than a half-hour after pulling them out of the oven.

  • 1 1/3 cup flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup Nutella
  • 1 egg
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 cup chocolate chips

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Combine the flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt in a medium bowl. Set aside.

In the bowl of a standing mixer, add the sugars, the butter and Nutella. Mix until the ingredients are fluffy. Add the egg and vanilla and stir until incorporated. Gradually add in the dry ingredients at low speed until just incorporated. Add in the chocolate chips and stir and gently stir.

Form 1-inch balls of dough and place them on parchment-lined cookie sheets. Bake for 6-8 minutes minutes. Transfer to cooling racks, and store in airtight containers for up to 1 week.

Makes about 2 dozen.

Recipe adapted from: The Dinner Club

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by Caitlin Saniga

Caramel pudding cups with gingerbread groundhogs

Did you ever try the “dirt and worms” snack as a kid? It consisted of crushed Oreos, layered with whipped cream and topped with gummy worms. These pudding cups were inspired by that elementary school treat.

Let me just say that this recipe took a lot of work. I started making my own groundhog-shaped cookie cutter from a pop can Friday morning and mixed up the cookie dough that afternoon. I made the pudding and baked the cookies on Saturday morning, whipped up the whipped cream that afternoon and finished the assembly in the evening. By the time I dipped in my spoon for the first taste, I darn well deserved it.

Was it worth it? To me, yes. The cookies were delicious, the pudding was a culinary challenge I can now cross off my list, and whipped cream is always best when made from scratch. Could I have taken shortcuts? Ooooh, yeah.

For starters, I could have bought a groundhog cookie cutter like this or decided on some other shape to use, like a circle. I could have skipped making my own gingerbread altogether and found some kind of premade cookie at the grocery store (Maybe Nutter Butters?). I certainly could have saved myself some nail-biting if I’d just used an instant pudding mix. And store-bought whipped cream almost seems like a no-brainer. Will I hold it against you if you don’t make everything from scratch? Of course not! I’m the idiot who thought making this dessert for two days straight sounded like a good idea.

But if you’re up to the challenge, I’ve summed up every step you need to know to make these Groundhog Day pudding cups from scratch. Shall we begin?

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I experimented with shapes and sizes and ended up liking these two. The tall one measures about 2 inches vertically, while the other one is about 1 1/2 inches.

I experimented with shapes and sizes and ended up liking these two. The tall one measures about 2 inches vertically, while the other one is about 1 1/2 inches. I liked the longer cookies because you could really push them down into the pudding without losing too much of the head shape.

Groundhog cookie cutter

*Note: Making your own cookie cutter can be dangerous if you’re not careful. Don’t use dull blades, and handle the metal, which is very sharp, with care.

You’ll need:

  • a clean aluminum soda can
  • a very sharp knife with a pointed tip and flat blade (I used a paring knife.)
  • a pair of scissors
  • a ruler
  • a permanent marker
  • a stapler
See those jagged edges? Those were cut with my sharp paring knife. If anyone knows of a better, safer way to cut off the top and bottom of a pop can, please comment and let us know!

See those jagged edges? Those were cut with my sharp paring knife. If anyone knows of a better, safer way to cut off the top and bottom of a soda can, please comment and let us know! This was the best I could come up with my limited tool supply.

Cut off the top and bottom of the aluminum can with a knife. Watch your fingers, and start each cut with a stab of the point.

Use scissors to make a vertical cut along the length of the open cylinder. You’ll be left with a curled sheet of metal.

Carefully flatten the metal with one hand, reinforcing it with a ruler parallel to the long edge. Use a marker to trace a line along the ruler. Draw a parallel line about 1/2 inch from the first one.

Once you make your cuts, you'll have a thin strip of metal to work with.

Once you make your cuts, you’ll have a thin strip of metal to work with.

Use scissors to cut along the lines you’ve drawn. Be as precise as possible to ensure clean cuts into your cookie dough later. You’ll be left with a curled strip of metal.

From there, bend the strip into the outline of a groundhog, leaving about 1/2 inch excess at the end of the strip. Hard creases may tear the aluminum, so soft bends are best. Use the excess of the strip to overlap with the other end, and staple it to close the shape.

Makes 1 cookie cutter.

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If you don't have a groundhog cookie cutter (Who the heck does??) and you aren't up for making your own, I suggest using a circle-shape cookie cutter or a glass to make small round cookies.

If you don’t have a groundhog cookie cutter (Who the heck does??) and you aren’t up for making your own, I suggest using a circle-shape cookie cutter or a glass to make small round cookies. And is it me, or do my groundhogs look like owls?

Gingerbread cookies

I started the dough for these a day early. See the recipe I used here.

You’ll need:

  • 6 cookies for groundhog garnish
  • 1 1/2 cups crushed cookies, or 10-12 cookies, for “dirt”

For the groundhogs, I used a toothpick to poke holes for eyes after the cookies had baked and set.

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To stop skin from forming on the top of the pudding, press a square of plastic wrap against the top of the pudding and chill.

To stop skin from forming on the pudding, press a square of plastic wrap against the top before chilling.

Practice mis-en-place, and do measure each ingredient ahead of time! You'll thank me as your dabbing the sweat off your forehead and watching your pudding change colors.

Practice mis-en-place, and measure each ingredient ahead of time! You’ll thank me as your dabbing the sweat off your forehead and watching your pudding change colors.

Caramel pudding

I placed a lot of faith in Smitten Kitchen for this one. Didn’t make too many tweaks except for the type of milk, which I switched to skim (and it worked just fine!). We don’t normally do this, but I’m going to direct you to SK’s blog post and advise you to read the recipe 2 or 3 times, assemble your ingredients and take some deep breaths before you start.

Don’t even think about stepping away from the pot once you start! Your diligence will pay off!

Recipe: Smitten Kitchen

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Whipped cream

  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 3 tablespoons powdered sugar
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

In the bowl of an upright mixer fitted with a whisk, combine the whipping cream, powdered sugar and vanilla, and beat on high until a semi-firm consistency is reached, about 3 minutes.

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Pudding cup assembly

With your pudding already chilled in 6 lowball glasses, sprinkle 1/4 cup crushed gingerbread cookies into each glass. Top with whipped cream and wedge a groundhog cookie into each cup.

Serve and enjoy!

Makes 6.

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