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Posts Tagged ‘food processor’

by Caitlin Saniga

Pucker up! You're about to fall in love with these cute and simple buttermilk biscuits. Because this recipe contains yeast, the dough isn't as finicky and can be kneaded until smooth. And it still yields fluffy biscuits!

Pucker up! You’re about to fall in love with these cute and quick buttermilk biscuits. Because this recipe contains yeast, the dough isn’t as finicky and can be kneaded until smooth. And it still yields fluffy biscuits!


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by Caitlin Saniga

The dill and roasted chestnuts are the highlights of this soup, making it wonderfully fragrant.

  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped (about 1 cup)
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped
  • salt
  • 1 medium head cauliflower (about 2 pounds), florets and stems cut into 1-inch pieces (8 to 9 cups)
  • 4 cups water
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh dill, plus more for garnish
  • 5 large kale or collard leaves, or a combination, stems removed and leaves roughly chopped
  • pepper
  • 10 chestnuts

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Heat the olive oil in a large pot over medium heat; cook the onion, covered, until soft, 4 to 5 minutes. Add the garlic and a pinch of salt, and cook for 3 minutes more. Add the cauliflower, and pour in the water until it reaches just below the top of the cauliflower.

Bring to a boil over high heat. Add 2 tablespoons dill. Reduce heat to low, and simmer until cauliflower is just tender, about 10 minutes. Stir in the kale, and simmer for 3 minutes.

Let sit for 5 minutes to cool slightly. Stir in the remaining 2 tablespoons dill. Puree soup in batches in a blender until very smooth, adding more water (about 1/2 cup) if it’s too thick. Return to the pot, and reheat. Season with salt and pepper.

Meanwhile, slice large X’s in the skin of each chestnut. Arrange the nuts on a rimmed baking sheet and place in the oven to roast for 15-20 minutes, or until the skin begins to peel away. Allow nuts to cool about 5 minutes before peeling completely with your hands and a knife (if you need it). Chop the chestnuts into pieces.

Garnish the soup with dill, black pepper, a drizzle of oil, a pinch of sea salt and a sprinkling of chestnuts. Serve immediately.

Makes 4 servings.

Recipe adapted from: MarthaStewart.com

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by Caitlin Saniga

I took the extra minutes to grate each ingredient separately so I could arrange each color on the plate. If you want to save time, just grate the ingredients one after the other and serve as a mixed batch.

Salad:

  • 2 raw medium beets, trimmed, scrubbed and quartered
  • 1/4 red cabbage, quartered
  • 2 large carrots, peeled and trimmed
  • 1 pear, core removed and quartered
  • 1 apple, core removed and quartered
  • 1 cup walnut halves, roughly bashed
  • 2 handfuls fresh parsley, chopped

Dressing:

  • 1 tablespoon mayonnaise
  • 2 teaspoons dijon mustard
  • 3 tablespoons cider vinegar
  • 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 teaspoons hot sauce
  • salt and pepper

The best part about this salad is mixing all the little shreds of color together. Oh, and the dressing ties for the best part about this salad. Have I mentioned how much I love vinaigrettes?

To make the salad:

Put a coarse grater attachment into a food processor and push ingredients through, one at a time, transferring them to a serving dish after each turn: pear, apple, carrots, cabbage, beets.

To make the dressing:

Whisk together the mayonnaise, mustard, vinegar, oil, Worcestershire sauce and hot sauce. Season with salt and pepper.

Serve the salad with the dressing, walnuts and parsley. Toss each serving so it’s a mass of rainbow colors.

Makes 8 servings.

Recipe adapted from: MarthaStewart.com

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by Sarah Steimer

I loved the Mediterranean taste of this pesto – although I do wonder how different the taste or texture would be if I actually found jarred, oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes instead of just plain sun-dried toms.

  • 1 (8.5-ounce) jar sun-dried tomatoes packed in olive oil OR I used about 2 cups worth of dry sun-dried tomatoes which I rehydrated in warm water for about a half hour
  • olive oil (only if you didn’t use oil-packed tomatoes)
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cup (packed) fresh basil leaves
  • 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan

In a food processor, combine the sun-dried tomatoes (including the oil if you found the jarred version), garlic, salt and pepper, and basil. If

I used this pesto as a burger topping this time around. My friend Logan doesn’t like a sloppy tomato slice on his burgers all the time and thought this was an awesome substitute.

you did not get the jarred tomatoes, drizzle in olive oil as the machine mixes until you reach a desired consistency. Be sure to scrape the bowl down as you go.

Remove the mixture from the food processor and mix in the Parmesan by hand.

Recipe adapted from: Giada De Laurentiis via the Food Network

*Presto is our June guide that proves pesto goes way beyond basil. Find all of our Presto pesto recipes here.

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by Caitlin Saniga

This is one mighty pesto, exploding with spicy, garlicky goodness. Be warned: A little goes a long way, and just like bulb garlic, scapes are a total breath wrecker. Keep the mouthwash nearby.

  • 1 cup 1-inch lengths garlic scapes, buds removed
  • 1/2 cup chopped parsley
  • 1/2 cup pine nuts
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese (or 1/4 cup Parmesan and 1/4 cup Manchego … That’s what I used.)
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 3/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • salt and pepper, to taste

The season for scapes is short, usually just a few weeks in June. I got these Persian star garlic scapes from my friend Ryan**, who grows garlic at his farm in Bedford County, Va. This variety is on the spicy side and yielded a bold, tingly-on-the-tongue pesto.

If you’ve never worked with scapes before, here’s a tip for chopping it. Each scape looks like a long, twisty, green stem with a small, yellow-green bulge somewhere in the middle. Notice that the scape is slightly tapered along its length and that after the yellow-green bulge, which is the blossom,  it’s much thinner. Cut off the blossom, and discard it along with the skinny green top. This part of the plant is stringy and less flavorful and will work against you if your aim is a smooth pesto.

You’ll be left with the thicker green part, which has a similar consistency to blanched asparagus, if you ask me. Chop this part of the scape into 1-inch lengths. For me, it took about 2 dozen smallish scapes to fill up 1 cup. Of course, you could always use less scapes and more parsley if you want a milder pesto.

I'm sure this pesto would be delicious served with the typical pasta, but I used it recently on an egg sandwich with some radicchio.

I’m sure this pesto would be delicious served with the typical pasta, but I used it on an egg sandwich with some radicchio.

Add the scapes, parsley, pine nuts, cheeses and olive oil to the bowl of a food processor. Puree until smooth, pausing to scrape down the sides of the bowl a couple of times. If the pesto isn’t as smooth as you’d like it, add more olive oil a tablespoon at a time.

Store the pesto in a sealed glass or ceramic container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. (I’m afraid a plastic container would forever smell like garlic!) The pesto will mellow out slightly as it sits.

Makes about 1 1/2 cups.

** You can read more about Ryan’s farm on his A Scape Clause blog.

*Presto is our June guide that proves pesto goes way beyond basil. Find all of our Presto pesto recipes here.

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by Caitlin Saniga

Eddie's Christmas present to me was a new food processor! Hollaaaa! What better way to break in the new machine than with a lovely hummus?

Eddie's Christmas present to me was a new food processor! Hollaaaa! What better way to break in the new machine than with a lovely hummus?

  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1/4 cup tahini (sesame-seed paste)
  • 2 garlic cloves, chopped coarsely
  • 1/3 cup fresh lemon juice (from 1 lemon)
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 (19-ounce) cans chickpeas — rinsed, drained and peeled
  • coarsely chopped parsley, for garnish
  • warm pita wedges

The secret to a smooth hummus is peeling the chickpeas first.

Place the water, tahini and garlic in the bowl of a food processor (Mine’s a 7-cup bowl.), and pulse until the mixture is smooth, about 10 seconds. Add the remaining ingredients, and pulse until smooth, pausing now and then to scrape down the sides, a total of about 30 seconds.

Pour the hummus into a bowl, garnish with a sprinkling of paprika, a dash of pepper and a small handful of parsley. Serve with warm pita wedges. Store leftovers in a sealed container in the fridge for up to 4 days.

Makes about 4 cups.

Sarah also makes a delicious chunky-style garlic hummus.

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