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Posts Tagged ‘lamb’

by Sarah Steimer

Moroccan-spiced lamb kebabs

Bill was in the mood for some kebabs, and he landed on this well-spiced lamb recipe. He found the recipe, cooked it up and let me snap photos — and claim at least a teensy bit of credit. We had these kebabs with the chickpea salad I posted Monday, and it was the perfect complement.

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by Caitlin Saniga | photos by Joel Hawksley

Lamb meatballs with feta, pine nuts and Moroccan spices

These Moroccan meatballs are packed with lots of surprises. I loved the soft pine nuts, mild lemon flavor and pockets of tangy feta cheese.

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by Caitlin Saniga

harira

Aunt Karen has been raving about harira, a Moroccan lamb stew or soup, every time I’ve visited her for the past three years. She shared the recipe long ago, but I just recently had the leg of lamb and the motivation to try it out. It ended up being fairly simple to make. I served mine over long-grain rice, which made for a hearty meal with lots of flavor. Aunt Karen uses a few different ingredients in her harira: bulgur wheat rather than chickpeas, slightly less liquid and mint alone rather than the herb mixture.


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by Caitlin Saniga

Coriander-garlic lamb kebabs

I’d never cooked with lamb before this, and one thing I learned is that the leg is a somewhat complex piece of meat. The one I bought included the bone and had lots of fat on the outer edge. I understand that if you buy leg of lamb by the pound from a butcher, you can request to have the bone removed and the fat trimmed. I’d suggest going that route to cut back on prep time, but it was kind of fun to dissect the piece myself. It definitely helped me get acquainted with this new-to-me red meat.


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by Sarah Steimer

I clearly haven't yet mastered the art of photographing meatloaf. Check out the NYTimes' photo if you'd like a more attractive idea of what you'll be making.

  • 1 cup fine-grain bulgur (in your grocer’s foreign foods aisle)
  • 1 pound lamb shoulder, ground fine (I used ground beef, sorry tradition)
  • 1/4 cup chopped onion
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • pinch cayenne pepper
  • salt and pepper
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cups sliced onions, 1/4-inch thick
  • 1/2 cup pine nuts, lightly toasted

Rinse the bulgur well, then cover with cold water and soak for 20 minutes. Drain well.

Put the drained bulgur, lamb (beef!), grated onion, cumin and cayenne in a large mixing bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Mix well with your hands. With a wooden spoon, beat in about 1/2 cup ice water until the mixture is smooth and soft.

Heat the olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the onions and fry gently, stirring occasionally, until they soften. Season with salt and pepper. Raise the heat and add 1/4 cup of the lamb (beef!) mixture. Continue frying, allowing the meat to get crumbly and the onions to brown nicely. Stir in the pine nuts. Let cool to room temperature.

Lightly oil a shallow 9-by-13-inch baking dish, then press half the remaining lamb mixture evenly over the bottom of the pan. Spread half the onion-pine nut mixture over the meat. Add the rest of the meat to the pan, patting and pressing it with wet hands to make a smooth top. I didn’t go all the way to the edges with mine, but I’m sure it doesn’t make a difference.

Bake uncovered at 350 degrees for 35 to 45 minutes, until the top is golden. Do not overcook! Split the loaf in the middle to check to make sure the meat is cooked, but do not leave in the oven too long – I could see this getting dry easily. Spread with the remaining onion-pine nut mixture. Serve warm, at room temperature or cool, with a dollop of Greek or plain yogurt. FYI: This is fantastic when you heat it up the next day.

Serves 4 to 6 (I bet it could serve a lot more, actually).

Recipe adapted from: The New York Times

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