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Posts Tagged ‘leeks’

by Caitlin Saniga

Potato-leek soup with herb oil

I love soups with swirls. This soup features a really nice fresh herb and sauteed shallot oil that can be drizzled on top of each serving, and then twirled into the soup with a toothpick.

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by Sarah Steimer

Asparagus, leek and Gruyere quiche

This was my first quiche and it turned out really quiet fantastic. It was the perfect dish for the Easter brunch we hosted (and paired quiet well with some French toast, potatoes, mimosas and bloody Marys). You know what else this quiche would be perfect for? Mother’s Day!

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by Sarah Steimer

Honey mustard Brussels sprouts over pureed cauliflower

Everyone has heard me say at least 5,000 times that I love fall flavors. But really, what is more satisfying than harvest-time veggies with just the right seasoning and a great combination of textures? I’m also really getting down with sweet and spicy flavors on my veggies lately, like this spicy mustard and honey combination. Another great one? Honey and sriracha. (More on that later.)

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by Sarah Steimer

This was the dish that officially shot me into spring. I love the brightness from the lemon zest and the zip from the leeks and chives. It was just such a well-rounded dish. And take note: Don't be afraid to add more of the cooking water than you think you need to. Better for the pasta to be a little sloppy that too sticky and paste-like.

This was the dish that officially shot me into spring. I love the brightness from the lemon zest and the zip from the leeks and chives. Plus the colors are fantastic. It was just such a well-rounded dish. And take note: Don’t be afraid to add more of the cooking water than you think you need. Better for the pasta to be a little loose than too sticky and paste-like.

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by Sarah Steimer

I paired this risotto with an asparagus-Gruyere tart. The mint in this dish may seem odd for a risotto, but it's balanced very nicely with the salty pork chorizo. And one last thing - this picture doesn't do it justice. It looks dry here only because it's the leftover batch. Straight from the pan it was perfectly creamy.

  • 2 1/2  cups chopped leeks (about three leeks using mainly the white and light green parts)
  • 1 cup  aborio rice
  • 1/2 cup white wine
  • 4-5 cups  hot stock (chicken or vegetable)
  • 1/4 cup finely diced chorizo, if you can find the cured version. If not, use one chorizo sausage and remove from its casing. Cook as you would ground beef
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1/3 cup grated Pecorino Romano cheese
  • 1  lemon (zest and juice)
  • 2 cups  blanched fresh OR frozen peas
  • 1/4 cup fresh mint
  • 1/4 cup fresh Italian parsley
  • salt and pepper, to taste

Begin heating the stock on the stove.

In the meantime, puree 1 cup of peas (ONLY ONE), lemon juice and zest, mint, parsley, and salt and pepper. Pulse in a food processor until it resembles a pesto. Set aside.

Add the oil and butter to a large pan with high sides. Allow the butter to melt before adding the leeks. Sauté, stirring frequently, until the leeks have wilted and the white parts are translucent. Add the rice and stir for about one minute, so the butter and oil coats the rice. Add the white wine and simmer for until the liquid is absorbed.

Add the hot stock to the pan one cup at a time, waiting to add the next cup once the first is absorbed. Repeat either until all the stock is used or the rice reaches your desired consistency. I used a little less than four cups.

Turn off the heat and add the pea-mint puree, cheese, chorizo and additional salt and pepper, if desired. Stir until fully combined. Serve warm with additional shredded cheese.

Makes four to six servings.

Recipe adapted from: Feasting at Home

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by Sarah Steimer

Never had celery root before? It taste like an earthier version of the celery stalk itself. Rocket science.

  •  3 leeks, white and yellow only parts only, cleaned and sliced
  • olive oil
  • 1 1/2 pounds celery root, peeled cubed
  • 1 3/4 cups chicken OR vegetable broth
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream (I used 2 percent to healthy it up)
  • salt and pepper
  • 2 slices crispy bacon, crumbled
  • 1/2 tart apple, cut into thin matchsticks

Using a Dutch oven or a medium-sized pot, sauté the leeks in the olive oil until softened.

Add the celery root, broth and 3 cups of water. Bring the liquids to a boil, then reduce to a simmer for 30-40 minutes or until the celery is soft.

Puree the mixture with an immersion blender or regular blender (a little at a time). In the pot – but off the heat – add the cream or milk, along with the salt and pepper to taste.

Garnish with the bacon and apples.

Makes 4 servings.

Recipe adapted from: Picture and Pancakes

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by Caitlin Saniga

This gratin was a nice alternative to mashed potatoes at Aunt Karen's Thanksgiving feast.

This gratin was a nice alternative to mashed potatoes at Aunt Karen's Thanksgiving feast.

  • salt
  • 3 pounds small potatoes (such as red or Yukon gold), sliced 1/8 inch thick
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus more for buttering dish
  • 10 medium leeks, washed thoroughly, white and light-green parts only, halved lengthwise and cut crosswise into 1-inch pieces
  • 4 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh chives, for garnish
Overlap the potatoes in a spiral or ring pattern in the dish.

Overlap the potatoes in a spiral or ring pattern in the dish.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. In a large pot of salted boiling water, parboil potatoes for 5 minutes. Drain potatoes well and set aside.

In a large skillet, heat butter over medium heat. Saute the leeks and garlic until the leeks are tender, about 7 minutes. Set aside.

In a buttered 9-by-13-inch baking dish or a large casserole dish, arrange half of the reserved potatoes in an overlapping pattern. Pour 1 cup cream and 1/2 cup milk over top and sprinkle with 1 teaspoon salt. Top with the reserved leeks and arrange remaining potatoes. Pour remaining cream and milk over potatoes and sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon salt. Bake until the potatoes are tender, the top of the gratin is golden brown, and most of the cream and milk have been absorbed, about 45 minutes. Garnish with chives.

Recipe adapted from: Country Living (and prepared by Aunt Karen)

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