Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘nutmeg’

by Caitlin Saniga

Gingerbread lattes

Gingerbread lattes are the ultimate indulgence, and my recipe doesn’t cut them any slack. If you don’t have or can’t find whole spices for every ingredient listed, don’t worry. Pinches of ground spices can be substituted. If you don’t have an espresso machine, use instant espresso and try steaming milk on the stove (YouTube has some great demos).


(more…)

Read Full Post »

by Caitlin Saniga

Chai spice palmiers

Chai spice palmiers: part pastry, part cookie, part candy, part addiction problem.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

by Sarah Steimer

Plum coffee cake

This coffee cake was one of my favorite recent baking projects. It was fairly simple to make and the plums were fantastic. I actually enjoyed it with a few extra fresh plum slices on the side.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

by Caitlin Saniga

I'm always on the hunt for new sweet potato toppings, and these ingredients really hit the spot.

I’m always on the hunt for new sweet potato toppings, and these ingredients really hit the spot.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

by Caitlin Saniga

Lemon-pepper popovers with nutmeg and parlsey

I’m so thankful, time and again, for the therapeutic powers that cooking has. Whatever emotion you’re feeling, the process of cooking something demands a certain focus. I made these popovers on Friday night, when I was feeling a bit lonely. (Joel moved to Rhode Island last week for a new job, so our new adventure is the long-distance relationship.) I needed a project to distract me from my thoughts. So popovers it was. If you’ve never had popovers, know that they’re not muffins, like their shape might suggest. They’re more along the lines of airy, eggy biscuits with buttery, crispy exteriors. They puff up out of the muffin pan to practically double in size, and they’re best served warm, of course. Anyway, I let myself get into a bit of a cooking daze on Friday night: Grate the nutmeg, zest the lemon, grind the pepper, chop the parsley. Mix the dry ingredients, then the wet, then combine. Add some melted butter. These are all familiar steps that when strung together form their own tempo. After the muffin pan went into the oven, I watched for awhile as the bubbling butter in each cup pushed up the batter. I must have let my eyelids close because I awoke to the sound of the timer going off, with my temple pressed against the glass door. And there they were, sizzling in pools of butter, the popovers were like unsteady giants in their muffin cups. I didn’t let them cool long before taking a bite. You’ll have to taste for yourself to know: I forgot about feeling lonely.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

by Caitlin Saniga

Sauteed cucumbers with butter and herbs

Who would ever have imagined warm cucumbers could be tasty? Sauteing them in butter softens and sweetens them, and the nutmeg and parsley keep the flavors fresh.


(more…)

Read Full Post »

by Sarah Steimer

I’ll admit to two issues I had with this pie: the middle sunk in and the apple filling was a little mushier than I had intended. Luckily, neither problem affects how delicious this pie is. To avoid a sinking crust, I should have used my handy little pie bird. The mushiness, however, is sometimes unavoidable because it depends so heavily on the apples themselves, which you have little control over.

Follow this recipe for the cheddar crust (I previously used it to make a blueberry pie — I love it).

For the filling:

  • about 6 Granny Smith apples, or other good pie apples such as Cortland (may need to increase the number), cut into 1/4-inch wedges
  • 1/4 cup good-quality honey
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 3/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
  • 1 egg, beaten

Combine all ingredients in a bowl.

Cut the refrigerated dough in half. Roll the one half into a 13-inch circle. Place the circle into a 10-inch pie dish, allowing the dough to sink into shape, and refrigerate. Roll out the second half of the dough into another circle and place onto a piece of wax or parchment paper. Lay flat in the refrigerator. Both should be chilled for about 30 minutes.

A little sunken, but still a really beautiful pie. There’s not a whole lot that looks prettier to me than a big, fresh pie sitting on a kitchen tea towel. Guess who’s already looking forward to her holiday diet?

When ready, remove the dough from the refrigerator and let sit for a few minutes so they’re a little easier to work with — if the crusts are too hard, the top will break when you try to lay it over the apple mound. When ready, spoon the apples into the bottom pie crust (if you’re using a pie bird, put it in now!). Cover with the top crust and press the edges together to seal. Cut off any excess dough at the edges and crimp (optional). Cut a few slits into the top of the crust so the pie may vent.

Place the pie in the freezer for another 30 minutes. Remove and brush the pie with the egg, being sure not to leave any puddles of egg on the crust.

Bake at 425 for 10 minutes. Reduce the oven to 350 and bake for 45 minutes, until golden brown. Tent the pie with foil and bake for another 45 minutes, or until the juices are bubbling.

Let cool for at least an hour and a half before serving.

*This month we’re featuring classic pies that would be a great dessert at any Thanksgiving table. For the full list of pies, click here.

Read Full Post »

by Sarah Steimer

The blog where I got the recipe cut out a lot of the sugar, which I appreciated. There’s really no reason to go overboard on sugar with either carrots or cream cheese — both are so naturally sweet.

  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 3/4 cups canola oil
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cups grated carrots (about 2-3 large carrots)
  • 1/3 c chopped walnuts

Whisk flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, cloves and ginger in medium bowl.

In a large bowl, combine the sugar and oil. Whisk in eggs one at a time. Add flour mixture and stir until combined. Stir in carrots and walnuts.

Divide batter among cupcake molds fitted with liners, filling 3/4 of each. Bake cupcakes at 350 degrees for 14 to 18 minutes, or until a toothpick or knife inserted into the center comes out clean. Let cool before icing.

For the frosting:

  • 1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese, softened
  • 1/2 stick unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup (I did use pure maple syrup, not sure if this made any difference)

Using a hand or stand mixer, beat all the ingredients on medium until fluffy. Chill the frosting for a few minutes minutes, until it has set up enough to spread smoothly. After icing the cupcakes, sprinkle with cinnamon.

Makes 12 cupcakes.

Recipe adapted from: Mehan’s Kitchen

Read Full Post »

by Caitlin Saniga

Have you ever grated your own nutmeg? It tastes and smells dramatically different from the nutmeg that comes already grated in little jars at the store. It's fresh and floral and earthy. The large seed resting on the grater in the right of the photo is a nutmeg seed, and you can find whole nutmeg at bulk food stores.

  • 7 ounces shredded Swiss cheese (I used Emmental.)
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup white wine
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 clove garlic, finely minced
  • 1 ounce cherry-flavored liqueur (Kirschwasser is good.)
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • Freshly grated nutmeg, for topping

Dipper ideas:

  • sliced pear
  • crispy mini sausages
  • strips of grilled pita

When Sarah and I worked together at The Burr, one of Kent State's student-run magazines, we made several trips to The Melting Pot for dinner and desserts, courtesy of our editor John (left). This recipe is a copycat recipe for The Melting Pot's traditional Swiss fondue.

Toss the cheese with the flour in a bowl. Place a metal bowl over a saucepan filled with two inches of water (or use a double boiler). Bring the water to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to medium, and pour the wine into the bowl.

Stir in the lemon juice and garlic using a fork. Cook for 30 seconds, stirring constantly.

Add half of the cheese, and stir constantly until the cheese is melted. Add the remaining cheese a small amount at a time stirring constantly. Pour the liqueur slowly around the edge of the bowl.

Pull the cheese mixture away from the edge of the bowl and cook for about one minute or until the alcohol cooks off. Stir the liqueur into the cheese. Stir the pepper in gently. Pour into a hot serving bowl. Garnish with a dash of nutmeg and serve immediately.

Makes about 4 servings.

Recipe adapted from: RecipeSecrets.net

*Throughout February we’ll post fondue recipes as part of our Fond of You guide (get the Valentine’s Day reference?). You can find all of our fondue recipes here.

Read Full Post »