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Posts Tagged ‘red pepper’

by Sarah Steimer

Grilled chicken salad with garlic confit

I’m so glad a neighbor gave me two very packed bags of arugula, because it gave me an excuse to make this salad! I also now want to put garlic confit on everything. I’m sort of hoarding the rest of the dressing in my fridge right now.


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by Sarah Steimer

Chickpeas, chorizo and chevre

This was such a quick, one-pan meal that packed significantly more flavor that I could have expected. I’d love to tell you how the leftovers were, but we had seconds and polished the whole thing off in one sitting.

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by Caitlin Saniga | photo by Joel Hawksley

Two-color pepper salad with crunchy ramen and almonds

For the most crunch and zing, toss together this salad right before serving it.

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by Sarah Steimer

Honey mustard Brussels sprouts over pureed cauliflower

Everyone has heard me say at least 5,000 times that I love fall flavors. But really, what is more satisfying than harvest-time veggies with just the right seasoning and a great combination of textures? I’m also really getting down with sweet and spicy flavors on my veggies lately, like this spicy mustard and honey combination. Another great one? Honey and sriracha. (More on that later.)

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by Sarah Steimer

I'm calling this one of our best guides ever. These jams have been incredible and I've spent hardly any time on mine. No pectin, no canning, just a quick jam to store in the fridge for the week. And don't worry about it going bad — it does not last that long.

I’m calling this one of our best guides ever. These jams have been incredible and I’ve spent hardly any time on mine. No pectin, no canning, just a quick jam to store in the fridge for the week.

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by Sarah Steimer

These are a great side option for summer burgers, or anything, really. That is, once any of us dare to turn our ovens on again.

These are a great side option for summer burgers, or anything, really. That is, once any of us dares to turn the oven on again.


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by Sarah Steimer

I know we say the we love the flavors in many of our dishes, but I have to say that these are truly tastes that sing to me. Fall is my favorite season, especially for produce — plus I’m a sucker for Mexican food. You couldn’t make a more Sarah-centric meal, although I would accept challengers.

  • 1 chicken breast, poached and shredded/cubed
  • 1 poblano pepper, roasted, peeled and sliced
  • 1 acorn squash (try to find a small one)
  • 1 red onion, sliced about 1/4-inch thick
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 4-ounce log goat cheese
  • 4 soft corn tortillas, about 8 inches or so in diameter
  • 1/2 cup – 2/3 cup salsa verde (if you would like to make your own, try our recipe from last summer)

Cut the acorn squash in half and roast at 400 degrees, skin side down, for 40-50 minutes, or until the squash can be easily pierced with a fork.

You could do a lot of variations on these enchiladas. Shrimp or steak instead of chicken (or no meat at all for a vegetarian version). You could also go with a milder roasted bell pepper if poblanos are too spicy for your taste.

In the meantime, heat about a tablespoon of olive oil in a medium-sized sauté pan. Add the onions to the pan and cook until caramelized, occasionally de-glazing the pan with a little water when necessary. Set aside.

When the squash has cooked, scoop the flesh out of the skin and mash with the cumin, salt and pepper.

Set up an assembly line of ingredients to build the enchiladas. If your corn tortillas seem a bit dry and may break as you work with them, microwave them for a few seconds while covered with a moist paper towel.

Working down the center of the tortilla, layer a line of squash, onion, pepper, chicken and feta. Roll the enchilada up and place seam-side down in an 8-by-8-inch or 9-by-9-inch baking pan. Continue with the remaining ingredients so the four enchiladas fit snuggly in the pan.

The enchiladas may be refrigerated at this point if you are preparing them in advance!

By the way – BE CAREFUL when peeling/cutting poblanos. Mine were especially hot this time around and, four hours later, my fingers are still burning. Wear gloves when working with any hot pepper!

Before cooking, top the enchiladas with the salsa and sprinkle with any remaining goat cheese. Cook for about 20-25 minutes at 350 degrees.

Makes 2-4 servings.

Recipe adapted from: Brit + Co.

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by Sarah Steimer

I made the full recipe so Bill and I could eat it throughout the week. I noticed him break some tortilla chips in it one day, so I assume that’s a good upgrade if you’re looking for one. This is a vegan recipe, FYI.

  • 4 cups low-sodium vegetable broth/stock
  • 2 (14.5 oz) cans low-sodium fire roasted diced tomatoes
  • olive oil
  • 1 medium red onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 poblano pepper
  • 1 red bell pepper
  • 1 jalapeno, seeds and ribs removed for less spice
  • 1 cup dry quinoa
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon chipotle sauce (if you don’t have it, you can skip it or use hot sauce instead)
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 2 bay leaves
  • pinch ground cinnamon
  • 1 avocado, cut into 1/2 inch cubes (optional)

Roast, peel and chop the poblano and red peppers. (see Caitlin’s video if you need a how-to)

Heat a dutch oven or heavy, large pot over medium heat. Add enough olive oil just to cover the bottom and, once heated, add the onions. Cook the onions, stirring occasionally, until they have caramelized. Every once in awhile you may have to de-glaze the pan (keep the onions from sticking) by adding a little of the vegetable broth.

While the onions are cooking, combine the quinoa and 2 cups of water in a sauce pan. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for about 30 minutes or until all water is absorbed. Remove from heat and set aside.

Add the remaining vegetable both to the dutch oven, along with the tomatoes, garlic, jalapeno, poblano, red bell pepper, chili powder, coriander, cumin, bay leaves, cinnamon and chipotle sauce. Bring everything to a boil (you may need to put the lid on for this, that’s a lot of liquid to get boiling). Reduce the heat and let the soup simmer for about 25 minutes, uncovered and stirring occasionally.

Remove the bay leaves and add the cooked quinoa. Mix well and serve, topped with the cubed avocado.

Makes about six servings.

Recipe adapted from: Prevention RD

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by Sarah Steimer

The onion, red pepper and garlic base to this dish is a pretty powerful starting point – so don’t lose it to weak tomatoes. If you buy your tomatoes at the farmer’s market see if you can try a taste first.

  • 1/2 large white onion
  • 1/2 red pepper
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 garlic clove, finely minced
  • 2 teaspoons tomato paste
  • 1 15-ounce cans cannellini beans, drained and rinsed
  • 2 cups vegetable broth
  • 1/2 cup – 1 cup cherry or grape tomatoes, halved or quartered
  • 2-4 slices of good bread, sliced thick
  • 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, shredded
  • parsley or basil, for garnish

Chop the onions and peppers very finely – OR – pulse the vegetables a few times in a food processor for the fine mince, being careful not to puree.

Heat a medium or large pan over the stove, then add a few tablespoons of olive oil. Once the oil is warm, add the onions and peppers and season with the salt and pepper. Sauté until the vegetables are very soft. Add the garlic and tomato paste, stirring and cooking for a few minutes more.

I didn’t add the rest of the broth so mine was a little dryer than I think most ragouts. Next time I will definitely use all of the broth.

Add the beans and about 1 1/2 cups of the broth to the pan, stirring to remove any vegetables that may have gotten stuck to the pan. Allow the mixture to cook over medium heat until about half of the broth has evaporated. Mix in the sliced cherry tomatoes and the remainder of the broth, unless you prefer a less runny mixture.

Drizzle the slices of bread with olive oil and, if you please, rub with garlic. Place the slices under the broiler in the oven until well-browned.
Remove and sprinkle with a few tablespoons of Parmesan cheese. Stir the rest of the cheese into the bean mixture.

Spoon the bean and tomato mixture over the slices of bread and garnish with the parsley or basil.

Serves 2-4.

Recipe adapted from: Epicurious

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by Sarah Steimer

I had a few friends over and it had been very, very hot out. There was no part of me that wanted to be standing over a grill or an oven, so I decided to do sushi and vegetarian spring rolls. It took a little prep time, but turned out to be a really nice spread.

  • prepared sushi rice (recipe and directions here)
  • 1/2 of a small sweet potato, peeled and cut into french fry-sized strips
  • olive oil
  • 3/4 cup seasoned panko bread crumbs
  • 1 red pepper, cut into strips
  • 4 sheets nori paper
  • Sriracha

Simmer the sweet potato strips in a small sauce pan until soft. Remove the sweet potatoes, allowing to drain and come to room temperature.

My whole “too hot to cook” matra worked itself into the crunch, too. Instead of doing a tempura batter in hot oil, I just sautéed some seasoned panko crumbs.

Heat olive oil in a small saute pan. Add the bread crumbs and cook until golden brown. Add the sweet potatoes a handful at a time, tossing until covered in the crumbs. Set the sweet potato strips and extra bread crumbs aside.

Distribute about 2/3-3/4 cup of rice on a prepared sushi mat. Press the sheet of nori paper on top of the rice. About one-third of the way up the mat, from the bottom, add a few strips of the sweet potato strips and red pepper strips. Roll from the bottom up, pressing firmly at the end. Directions for rolling sushi can be found in this previous post.

Cut and arrange the sushi. Top with the leftover panko crumbs and a few drops of the Sriracha sauce.

 

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