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Posts Tagged ‘ricotta’

by Sarah Steimer

Squash blossoms with ricotta, corn and black beans and a roasted jalapeno chimichurri

Why not another squash blossom recipe! I you’re going to make some, go all out. Still not sold on edible flowers? At the very least, bookmark this amazing roasted jalapeno chimichurri sauce.

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by Caitlin Saniga

Spring ricotta gnocchi

There are lots of Providence restaurants on my to-try list, and Cook & Brown Public House, suggested by a co-worker, is one of them. Chef Nemo Bolin, who hails from the Providence restaurant, created this dish. I’ve modified it slightly, based mainly on the fact that I didn’t have immediate access to morels.

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by Sarah Steimer

Pea and fava bean pasta with ricotta and mint

The ricotta and Parmesan mixture was really spectacular, and it was light enough to keep this dish’s fresh spring appeal. I know it’s almost June, but I’m still riding happily along with spring flavors and produce.

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by Sarah Steimer

Shaved radish salad with mint and ricotta

This crisp little number is a great side dish for a more savory main. I’m used to the more traditional salted butter with radishes, so it was a very cool change to try it with the slightly sweeter ricotta.

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by Caitlin Saniga | photo by Joel Hawksley

Lemon-ricotta campenelle with toasted walnuts

This pasta is a great make-ahead meal for work lunches. I packed it as a lunch for a week straight: Each day I’d bring one large container of pasta and one small container of extra olive oil for drizzling. I mixed the walnuts in with the large original batch, so they softened over time, but I didn’t really mind it because they maintained lots of toasted flavor. If you prefer your walnuts to have some crunch, pack them separately.

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by Sarah Steimer

Pasta with brown butter beets and orange-sage ricotta

Don’t skimp on the seasoned ricotta! The orange zest and sage really add a fresh bite to the earthy pasta. The walnuts are a must as well, for the crunch factor. This dish is a playful pink for Valentine’s Day — but it also offers some very deep, wonderful flavors and velvety texture. Romance on a plate!

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by Sarah Steimer

This open-face sandwich is my riff on the “Train to Tuscany” at Publican Quality Meats here in Chicago. I love Publican Quality and have been absolutely nuts about the place since my first visit a year ago. The store is one part market, one part butcher and one part cafe. I always leave so inspired and want to copy everything, from the sandwiches down to the table settings.

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by Sarah Steimer

I love a nice, light sandwich for lunch, and these two don't require many ingredients and hardly any time. Cut off the crusts and slice into smaller bites and you also have some great tea sandwiches.

I love a nice, light bite for breakfast or lunch, and these two don’t require many ingredients and hardly any time. Cut off the crusts and slice into smaller bites and you also have some great tea sandwiches.

For the radish and scallions over Greek yogurt:

For each sandwich, use one piece of bread. Spread each piece of bread with about 2-3 tablespoons plain Greek yogurt. Top with one small, thinly sliced radish and one scallion, sliced on an extreme angle. Sprinkle with fresh crushed pepper.

For the apple with cinnamon over ricotta:

For each sandwich, use one piece of bread. Spread each piece of bread with about 2-3 tablespoons ricotta and sprinkle with ground cinnamon. Top with 1/4 of an apple, such as a Gala, sliced thin. Sprinkle again with cinnamon.

Recipes adapted from: Bon Appetit here and here

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by Sarah Steimer

I'm not big on New Year's resolutions, but I do want to try creating more of my own recipes. This was the first such invention of 2013. I expect it started the way most of my original recipes will start: with pure laziness and whatever happens to be in the pantry/fridge.

One of my goals this year is to make more of my own recipes. This was the first such invention of 2013. I expect it started the way most of my original recipes will start: with total laziness and whatever happens to be in the pantry/fridge.

  • 5-6 lasagna noodles
  • olive oil
  • 1/2 sweet onion, sliced thin
  • 1-2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 medium parsnip, peeled and cut into about 1/4-inch pieces
  • salt and pepper
  • 1/2 cup roughly chopped sun-dried tomatoes
  • 1/2 cup vegetable broth, divided
  • 1/4 cup roughly chopped fresh mozzarella
  • 3/4 cup ricotta
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 2 tablespoons fresh, chopped parsley
  • 2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 1-2 teaspoons crushed red pepper
  • 3 tablespoons shredded Parmesan or Asiago

Break the lasagna noodles into (not too small) pieces. Cook until al dente. Strain and return to the pot, tossing with a couple teaspoons of olive oil to keep the noodles from sticking together.

Heat a saute pan over medium-low heat and add about 2 teaspoons olive oil. Once the oil is hot, add the onion, garlic and parsnips. Season with salt and pepper. Cook for about 15 minutes or until the parsnips can be easily pierced with a fork. Occasionally add the broth as the vegetables cook to de-glaze the pan. Add the sun-dried tomatoes during the last few minutes of cooking time.

Whisk together the ricotta, egg yolk, parsley, oregano and crushed red pepper. Season with a pinch of salt.

Lightly grease the bottom and sides of an 8-by-8-inch cooking pan with olive oil. Loosely layer half of the noodles on the bottom. Sprinkle with half the mozzarella and evenly distribute half the onion, parsnip and tomato mixture. Dot with half of the ricotta mixture, working in 1-teaspoon increments. Repeat this layering with the second half of all ingredients and top with the shredded Parmesan or Asiago.

Bake at 375 degrees for about 30 minutes, or until the cheese on top has started to brown.

Makes about 4-6 servings.

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by Sarah Steimer

I'm not that into casseroles. The name isn't even appealing. And I always picture a dish full of soupy cream of mushroom with cauliflower floating in it. But this is a genius spin on that horrible imagery.

I’m not that into casseroles. The name isn’t even appealing. And I always picture a dish full of soupy cream of mushroom with cauliflower floating in it. But this is a genius spin on that horrible imagery.

  • 1 small-ish spaghetti squash, cooked (makes approximately 4 cups)
  • 1 egg white
  • 1 cup ricotta (8 ounces)
  • 1/3 cup packed, chopped parsley
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic. minced
  • 1/2 cup chopped onion
  • 2 uncooked sausages (I used spicy turkey sausage), cases removed
  • 1 small head kale, stems removed and chopped into ribbons
  • 1 cup crushed tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1/4 cup breadcrumbs

Whisk together and egg white, ricotta, parsley, red pepper, oregano and salt and pepper to taste.

In a large pan (preferably with high sides), heat enough oil to coat the bottom of the pan. Saute the onions and garlic until they are translucent. Add the sausage to the pan, breaking up the meat and cook.

Add the crushed tomato, kale and season with salt. Cover the pan and cook until the kale has wilted for 3-4 minutes. Add the cooked spaghetti squash.

Remove the pan from heat and add the ricotta mixture. Stir everything until well combined and transfer to an 8-by-8-inch or 9-by-9-inch baking dish.

In a small bowl, mix together the Parmesan, breadcrumbs and 1 tablespoon of olive oil, using your hands. Top the casserole with this breadcrumb mixture. Sprinkle the top with olive oil.

Cook the casserole at 450 degrees for 30-40 minutes, or until the top has turned golden brown.

Let the casserole cool for a few minutes before cutting into nine squares.

Makes about four servings.

Recipe adapted from: Everyday Maven

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