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Posts Tagged ‘sauerkraut’

by Caitlin Saniga

Slow cooker kielbasa and sauerkraut with skin-on mashed potatoes

I love when I’m home and Mom puts on a CrockPot of kielbasa and kraut for dinner — it’s a Saniga family favorite. The longer it cooks, the better the taste, with both components swapping some of their signature flavors. And no plate of kielbasa and kraut is complete without a small mountain of mashed potatoes. No frills here, just a simple, beloved meal.

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by Caitlin Saniga

Three-beet salad with purple potatoes, red beans and sauerkraut

My family heritage is partially Ukrainian and Slovakian, but I somehow missed out on world of beets and borscht while I was growing up. Now that I’ve discovered my love of beets, I’m making up for lost time.


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by Sarah Steimer

Sauerkraut deviled eggs with thyme

The best parts of your deviled eggs don’t have to be tucked into the filling — they can be sprinkled on top like the thyme and smoked paprika on these eggs.

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by Sarah Steimer

The original author of this recipe said the inspiration came from a deli-style Reuben sandwich — and I can definitely see it. It’s great to enjoy these sorts of flavors (the sauerkraut and steak-like spices) in a lighter, meatless setting. I went nuts for the sauerkraut-chickpea puree especially. I saved my leftovers in a glass jar and snacked on it for a few days after.

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by Caitlin Saniga

Stuffed cabbage

Stuffed cabbage was another one of Baboo’s signature dishes. She called it “pigs in a blanket.” She’d prepare a big batch and serve it with mashed potatoes and, if we were lucky, some apple crisp with French vanilla ice cream for dessert. Even though this isn’t Baboo’s recipe (I actually called my Great Aunt Martha, Baboo’s sister-in-law, for some tips.) I still felt so close to her while I was making this.

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by Caitlin Saniga

Haluski: cabbage and noodles

Haluski, a Slovakian comfort food that mixes together cabbage, onions and noodles, was one of my favorite foods that Baboo Saniga made. The way she prepared it makes for an awesome combination of flavors. The onions add a bit of sweetness, the butter adds smoothness, the cabbage adds crunch and the sauerkraut adds some tang.

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by Caitlin Saniga

No one in our family knows where the word “machinic” came from. We don’t even know what it means, really. For all I know, Baboo, who is Ukranian and made this recipe often, could have made up the recipe and the word. But to us, it means sauerkraut bread. Machinic is a soft, thin bread flavored primarily by sauerkraut and bacon grease, and it’s great served as a snack or with hearty dishes of meat and vegetables. My favorite part of machinic are the crispy edges. Yum!

  • 4 cups flour
  • 4 strips bacon, cut in small pieces (optional)
  • 1/2 cup bacon fat
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 bag sauerkraut, with some of the liquid drained, and cut in pieces

Mom hit the jackpot when she found this handwritten recipe from Baboo because Baboo hardly ever wrote down recipes. Many of them simply lived in her head. I want to frame this!

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Mix together the flour, bacon, bacon fat, salt and baking powder. Add the sauerkraut, and mix in with your hands. You might have to add a little water to a make a soft but not sticky dough, Baboo notes.

Sprinkle flour over a flat surface, and roll out the dough until it’s about 1/4-inch thick. Transfer the dough to a baking sheet, and use a pizza cutter to slice the dough into 2-inch squares. Bake for about 1 hour.

Makes about 20 squares (plus other crunchy odds and ends).

Recipe: Great Grandma Saniga

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