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Posts Tagged ‘snacks’

by Sarah Steimer

Maple-cayenne popcorn

This popcorn was gone in a flash. If you’d like to slow yourself down, try offering this up with a bowl of nuts and dried cranberries on the side. Or just try not to be a snack monster like I am.

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Every family has its staples and traditions at Thanksgiving, and that’s part of what makes the holiday great. But every once in a while, it’s not just the bread for stuffing that gets stale. If you’re looking for some inspiration for a new dish or two, try our guide! We collected some of our favorite recipes from the past few years.

Should you try any of these recipes, please let us know. We would love to hear that we gained a spot at your Thanksgiving table.

— Sarah and Caitlin

Staples

Ideas for Thanksgiving basics: stuffing and turkey.

Ideas for Thanksgiving basics: stuffing and turkey.

Green beans

Our green bean recipes include a fresh take on a canned classic.

Our green bean recipes include a fresh take on a canned classic.

Potatoes

Roast 'em, mash 'em, boil 'em. Whatever you do — eat your potatoes.

Roast ’em, mash ’em, boil ’em. Whatever you do — eat your potatoes.

Carrots

Carrots at Thanksgiving? Helps to make sure your eyesight is perfect for watching the football game.

Carrots at Thanksgiving? Helps to make sure your eyesight is perfect for watching the football game.

Sweet potatoes

The only thing that could be better than a regular potato — is a sweet potato.

The only thing that could be better than a regular potato — is a sweet potato.

Brussels sprouts

Brussels have become a popular Thanksgiving side, so make some room for the little cabbages.

Brussels have become a popular Thanksgiving side, so make some room for the little cabbages.

Cranberry sauce

Sure, the stuff in the can ain't bad — if you don't mind seeing the can rings on your food (but really, we wouldn't judge).

Sure, the stuff in the can ain’t bad — if you don’t mind seeing the can rings on your food (but really, we wouldn’t judge).

Rolls and biscuits

Hey, it's Thanksgiving — the more starch the better.

Hey, it’s Thanksgiving — the more starch the better.

Beverages

You've got a long day ahead — and we all know what could help speed it up.

You’ve got a long day ahead — and we all know what could help speed it up.

Pie

And to wrap it all up: the fabulous pies.

And to wrap it all up: the fabulous pies.

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by Caitlin Saniga

I'm a fan of rice crispie treats that are on the verge of gooey, so adding that extra cup of super-tiny marshmallows really softens each bite.

  • 5 tablespoons butter
  • 4 cups mini marshmallows
  • 1 cup ultra-mini marshmallows (or chopped mini marshmallows)
  • 5 cups crisp rice cereal
  • 1 tablespoon milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla

These are the ultra-mini marshmallows I used. Cute, huh? I found them at a bulk foods market in Ohio. If you don't have these, that's fine! Just slice mini marshmallows in half, or heck, leave them whole for even bigger pockets of fluff.

Melt the butter in a large saucepan over low heat. Add the 4 cups of mini marshmallows and stir until melted. Add the milk and vanilla, and stir constantly for about 1 minute.

Remove the marshmallow mixture from heat. Add the cereal. Stir with a greased wooden spoon until the cereal is well coated in the marshmallow mixture. Add the ultra-mini marshmallows and stir quickly to mix them in.

Spray your hands with cooking oil. Pour the mixture into a greased 13X9 pan, and use your fingertips to press the mixture evenly and firmly into the pan.

Let cool for about 30 minutes. Make 3 cuts lengthwise, and 5 cuts on the width.

Makes 24.

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by Caitlin Saniga

Heat up the marinara sauce while the wontons are frying. That way everything is warm when you take your first bite of crispy, ooey-gooey awesomeness.

  • 4 ounces fresh mozzarella, cut into 1/4-inch cubes
  • 1/4 cup roasted red and/or orange peppers (from a jar or from scratch), cut into 1/4-inch pieces
  • 1 scallion, green part chopped finely
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 20 wonton wrappers
  • canola oil
  • water
  • 1 cup marinara sauce

It's OK if one or two spoons of this stuff make their way to your mouth instead of the wonton.

In a small bowl, toss together the cheese, pepper, scallion, parsley and garlic. Season with salt and pepper.

Spread out the wonton wrappers on a dry surface, such as a table or counter top. Scoop about a heaping teaspoonful of cheese mixture onto each wonton wrapper.

There's a fine line between too little filling and too much filling. You'll just have to find out what it is on your own!

Fill a small bowl with water. Wet a brush or your finger and use it to moisten the edges of one of the wonton wrappers. Fold the wrapper in half to form a triangle, and press the edges to seal it. Repeat until each wonton is sealed.

Preheat the oven to 200 degrees. Line a baking sheet with about 3 layers of paper towels, and place the baking sheet in the oven.

Just... wow. Enjoy this moment when it comes.

(You’ll transfer your finished wontons to the sheet to keep them warm while you fry the rest.)

Heat oil in a medium skillet over medium-low heat. (Put on an apron and use a large lid as a shield if need be. The oil gets hot and tends to splatter when you add the moistened wontons.) To test whether the oil is ready for frying, dash a couple of drops of water over the oil. If the oil crackles, it is ready. Working in batches, use a slotted spoon to place wontons into the hot oil. (I cooked the wontons 4 at time.) Cook them until the underside is golden, about 1 minute. Flip and cook until the other side turns golden, about another minute. Transfer the finished wontons to the baking sheet in the oven.

Serve warm with marinara sauce for dipping.

Makes 20.

P.S. Who thinks I should start doing my own instructional videos for simple preparation (like how to roast a red pepper)?

*Throughout December, “Merry and Bites” will feature finger foods with seasonal flair. All of them can be found here. Happy holidays!

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by Sarah Steimer

Be careful when you use a different pan than what the recipe calls for. You can usually use the same temperature, but the smaller the pan, the less time it will take.

  • 8 medium carrots
  • 1 1/3 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, completely softened
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/3 cup buttermilk (or 1/3 cup milk mixed with either 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice or 1/2 teaspoon vinegar)

Peel and slice three of the carrots into 1/4-inch rounds. Bring a medium saucepan of salted water to a boil, add the carrots and cook until soft, about 10 minutes. Drain. Let cool, and then puree in the food processor or blender. Coarsely grate the remaining 5 carrots (you should have 2 cups).

The first time I made this bread - it did not turn out well. Turns out my oven is 25 degrees off - spend the $7 and get yourself an oven thermometer.

Whisk the flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt into a bowl.

In a medium bowl, use a wooden spoon (or electric mixer) to mix the butter and sugar until smooth. Stir in the eggs one at a time until combined. Stir in the buttermilk, carrot puree and grated carrots. Add the flour mixture and mix until well-blended. Never overmix your quick bread!

Spread the batter either one 8 1/2-inch loaf pan OR three mini loaf pans. Bake until a knife or toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean, about 55-65 minutes for the large loaf or 35-45 minutes for the mini loaves.

Cool the bread on a rack for about 10 minutes before removing from the pan(s).

Recipe: The Fearless Baker (via NPR)

Photos: Sarah Steimer

*Throughout October, “Justin Loafin” will feature our favorite quick bread recipes for small loaves, large loaves or even muffins. All of the recipes from the guide can be found here. PLUS – make sure you check our archives for previous quick bread recipes.

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by Sarah Steimer

Not only is it healthier, but roasted chickpeas even look a heck of a lot classier than bright orange cheese puffs.

  • 1 can chickpeas
  • olive oil
  • spices (I used Suku spice, which consists of red pepper, turmeric, cumin, coriander, fenugreek and garlic)

Rinse the chickpeas and let dry on a paper towel.

Serve your snacks in cocktail glasses (it'll look like you made more than you actually did).

Once ready, toss with olive oil and your choice of spices. Place in a tin or glass pan in a single layer. Bake at 425 for 45 minutes to an hour – just keep an eye on them so they do not burn but crisp well.

Recipe: Sarah Steimer

Photos: Sarah Steimer

*Throughout September, “Snacks to Pack” will feature our favorite snack recipes for packing in lunches or eating on the go. All of them can be found here.

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by Sarah Steimer

I have a new apple butter recipe I want to try that would be awesome on these.

  • 2 1/2 cups plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup dark brown sugar, lightly packed
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 7 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into 1-inch cubes and frozen
  • 1/3 cup  mild-flavored honey, such as clover
  • 5 tablespoons milk, full-fat is best
  • 2 tablespoons pure vanilla extract
  • cinnamon, optional

Combine the flour, brown sugar, baking soda, and salt in the bowl of a food processor fitted or in the bowl of an electric mixer. Pulse or mix on low to incorporate. Add the butter and pulse on and off, or mix on low, until the mixture is the consistency of a coarse meal. (If you don’t have the right kitchen appliances – use your hands!)

In a small bowl, whisk together the honey, milk and vanilla extract. Add to the flour mixture and pulse on and off a few times or mix on low until the dough barely comes together. It will be very soft and sticky. Lay out a large piece of plastic wrap and dust it lightly with flour, then turn the dough out onto it and pat it into a rectangle about 1-inch thick. Wrap it, then chill it until firm, about 2 hours or overnight.

My crackers are a bit wobbly looking - but you can't taste shape, so who cares.

When ready, divide the dough in half and return one half to the refrigerator. Flour your work surface and roll the dough into a long rectangle about 1/8 inch thick. The dough will be sticky, so flour as necessary. Cut your dough to your preferred shape either with a knife or cookie cutter (I wish I had a square cookie cutter! So many items to put on my Christmas list…).

Place the crackers on one or two parchment-lined baking sheets and sprinkle with the cinnamon (optional). If you want the store-bought, ready-to-break lines – just use a knife to add the dashed lines, allowing the knife to go all the way through (the dough puffs up in the oven). I also added “holes” in mine by using the end of an electric mixer paddle/whisk thingy.

Chill until firm, about 30 to 45 minutes in the fridge or 15 to 20 minutes in the freezer. Repeat with the second batch of dough.

Bake the crackers at 350 degrees for 15 to 25 minutes, until browned and slightly firm to the touch, rotating the sheets halfway through to ensure even baking.

Makes… a lot? Depends on the size of your crackers, but I filled a freezer bag about halfway full, when well-packed.

Recipe: Smitten Kitchen

Photos: Sarah Steimer

*Throughout September, “Snacks to Pack” will feature our favorite snack recipes for packing in lunches or eating on the go. All of them can be found here.

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