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Posts Tagged ‘stuffing’

Every family has its staples and traditions at Thanksgiving, and that’s part of what makes the holiday great. But every once in a while, it’s not just the bread for stuffing that gets stale. If you’re looking for some inspiration for a new dish or two, try our guide! We collected some of our favorite recipes from the past few years.

Should you try any of these recipes, please let us know. We would love to hear that we gained a spot at your Thanksgiving table.

— Sarah and Caitlin

Staples

Ideas for Thanksgiving basics: stuffing and turkey.

Ideas for Thanksgiving basics: stuffing and turkey.

Green beans

Our green bean recipes include a fresh take on a canned classic.

Our green bean recipes include a fresh take on a canned classic.

Potatoes

Roast 'em, mash 'em, boil 'em. Whatever you do — eat your potatoes.

Roast ’em, mash ’em, boil ’em. Whatever you do — eat your potatoes.

Carrots

Carrots at Thanksgiving? Helps to make sure your eyesight is perfect for watching the football game.

Carrots at Thanksgiving? Helps to make sure your eyesight is perfect for watching the football game.

Sweet potatoes

The only thing that could be better than a regular potato — is a sweet potato.

The only thing that could be better than a regular potato — is a sweet potato.

Brussels sprouts

Brussels have become a popular Thanksgiving side, so make some room for the little cabbages.

Brussels have become a popular Thanksgiving side, so make some room for the little cabbages.

Cranberry sauce

Sure, the stuff in the can ain't bad — if you don't mind seeing the can rings on your food (but really, we wouldn't judge).

Sure, the stuff in the can ain’t bad — if you don’t mind seeing the can rings on your food (but really, we wouldn’t judge).

Rolls and biscuits

Hey, it's Thanksgiving — the more starch the better.

Hey, it’s Thanksgiving — the more starch the better.

Beverages

You've got a long day ahead — and we all know what could help speed it up.

You’ve got a long day ahead — and we all know what could help speed it up.

Pie

And to wrap it all up: the fabulous pies.

And to wrap it all up: the fabulous pies.

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Thanksgiving is all about tradition: watching the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, a Turkey Bowl football game and most importantly — the food. We’ve put some interesting twists on some very traditional Thanksgiving side dishes.

Buttermilk cornbread stuffing

by Sarah Steimer

The cornbread doesn't soak up the flavors like regular bread does, but it's a down-home style for stuffing.

For the cornbread:

  • 1 cup cornmeal
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/4 cups buttermilk (I never actually try to make buttermilk. Here’s how you fake one cup of buttermilk: Put one tablespoon of vinegar in a 1-cup measuring cup and fill the rest with milk. Allow to sit for a few minutes before you incorporate into your recipe.)
  • 1 large eggs
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted, cooled
Mix the first four ingredients in a large bowl. Whisk buttermilk, eggs and butter in medium bowl to blend. Stir buttermilk mixture into dry ingredients to blend (do not overmix). Pour batter into a prepared 9-inch round pan. Bake until tester inserted into center comes out clean and top is golden brown, about 25 minutes. Cool in pan. Once cooled, cut into cubes and toast in the oven at 350 degrees for about 15 minutes.

For stuffing:

  • 1 1/2 cups chopped onions
  • 1 cup chopped celery
  • 1/2 cup chopped shallots
  • 2 teaspoons sage
  • 1 tablespoon thyme
  • 3/4 cup pecans, toasted, coarsely chopped
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 2 large eggs, beaten to blend

Sauté onions, celery and shallots in butter until pale golden brown, about 10 minutes. Stir in sage and thyme. Add to cornbread cubes in bowl. Mix in pecans.

Stir chicken broth into stuffing. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Mix in eggs. Place in a buttered glass baking dish and cover with foil. Cook at 375 degrees for about an hour. Remove foil and allow top to brown, about five minutes.

Makes 10 servings.

Recipe adapted from: Epicurious

Photo: Sarah Steimer

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Apple, cranberry and pecan stuffing

by Caitlin Saniga

I usually only eat the mandatory spoonful of Thanksgiving stuffing, but I have a whole casserole dish of this stuff, and I'm not totally dreading having to eat all of it.

  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter plus more for the baking dish and foil
  • 1 large loaf Italian bread (about 1 pound), cut into 3/4-inch pieces (about 16 cups{!})
  • 2 medium onions, chopped
  • 4 celery stalks, thinly sliced
  • 2 Gala apples, cored and cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1 1/2  teaspoons salt, divided
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1 cup dried cranberries
  • 1 cop chopped toasted pecan halves
  • 1 tablespoon thyme leaves
  • 2 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
  • 2 large eggs

Heat oven to 375 degrees. Butter a 9-by-13-inch baking dish. Divide the bread between 2 rimmed baking sheets and bake until dry and crisp, 10 to 12 minutes.

Meanwhile, melt the butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onions, celery, apples, 1 teaspoon salt, and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until very tender and beginning to brown, 10 to 12 minutes. Add the wine and cook until evaporated, 2 to 4 minutes; transfer to a large bowl and let cool for 10 minutes.

Add the bread, cranberries, pecans, thyme, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and broth to the vegetables and toss to combine. Transfer to the prepared baking dish. Cover with buttered foil and bake for 20 minutes. Uncover and bake until browned, 20 to 30 minutes more.

Makes 8 servings, plus leftovers.

Recipe: Real Simple

Photo: Caitlin Saniga

More Thanksgiving Twist dishes: sweet potatoes, vegetables

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