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Posts Tagged ‘tangerine’

by Sarah Steimer

Freshest juice ever! I juiced and strained everything one evening when I had free time and stored the citrus juices and pomegranate juice separately. You could just mix the pomegranate juice in the same pitcher as the citrus, but I like how it settles toward the bottom when added right before serving.

Freshest juice ever! I juiced and strained everything one evening when I had free time and stored the citrus juices and pomegranate juice separately. You could mix the pomegranate juice in the same pitcher as the citrus, but I like how the pom settles toward the bottom when added right before serving.

  • 2 pomegrantes OR about 1 1/2 cups pomegranate juice
  • 2 grapefruits
  • 2 oranges (I used navel oranges)
  • 2 tangerines OR mineola tangelos
  • 1/2 lime

    I sort of expected pomegranate juice to require some extravagant extraction that only machines or very patient humans could do. Instead it's just seed, blend and strain.

    I sort of expected pomegranate juice to require some extravagant extraction that only machines or very patient humans could do. Instead it’s just seed, blend and strain.

If you choose to make your own pomegranate juice, simply seed the fruits and rinse. Add the pomegranate seeds to a blender and puree for only a couple of seconds; pureeing too long will create a cloudy juice. Pour the blended seeds through a fine mesh strainer, using a spatula to extract as much juice as possible. Set the pomegranate juice aside.

Juice the citrus fruits and pour through a fine mesh strainer to remove any pulp or seeds.

Divide the citrus juice among three glasses, adding the pomegranate juice last so it can settle toward the bottom.

Makes about three servings.

Recipe adapted from: Martha Stewart

*We’re taking advantage of the winter citrus season (and healthy New Year’s resolutions) during the month of January. Look for six drink recipes focused on lemons, limes, grapefruits, oranges and more. Find all the Fresh-squeezed recipes here.

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by Caitlin Saniga

I wanted a thicker glaze for this cake, so I used less juice and added some zest. P.S. My mom has mini-Bundt cake pans, so that's what I used. (But a lower cook time is definitely needed. I'd say 40 minutes or so.)

For the cake:

  • 1 cup unsalted butter, at room temperature, plus more for the pan
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour (spooned and leveled), plus more for the pan
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 6 large eggs
  • 2 tablespoons finely grated tangerine zest, plus 2/3 cup tangerine juice (from 7 tangerines)
  • 3/4 cup orange-flavored yogurt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

For the glaze:

  • 1 1/2 cups confectioners’ sugar
  • 1 teaspoons tangerine zest, plus 2 tablespoons tangerine juice (from 1 tangerine)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter and flour a 12-cup Bundt cake pan. In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda and salt.

In a large bowl, using an electric mixer, beat butter and granulated sugar on medium-high speed until it’s light and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in the tangerine zest and juice. With mixer on low, add flour mixture in three additions, alternating with two additions yogurt, and beat to combine; beat in the vanilla. Transfer batter the pan, smooth the top with the back of a spatula, and firmly tap pan on a flat surface to remove air bubbles.

Bake until a toothpick inserted in the center of the cake comes out clean, 55 to 60 minutes. Let the cake cool in the pan on a wire rack for about 30 minutes. Invert the cake onto a rack set in a rimmed baking sheet and let cool completely. (With a serrated knife, trim cake to sit flat, if necessary.)

Make the glaze by whisking together the confectioners’ sugar and tangerine juice until smooth. Spoon the glaze over the cake and let set 1 hour. Store covered at room temperature until you serve it.

Makes 12 servings.

Recipe adapted from: Everyday Food

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