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Posts Tagged ‘Thai’

by Caitlin Saniga

Thai ginger-peanut deviled eggs

As embarrassing as it is to admit, I have yet to crack the code on hard-boiled eggs. I’m no good at making them. I undercook or overdo them every single time. That’s why I talked Joel (an eggspert) into hard-boiling all of my eggs for me — and why I’ll leave you to your Googling or your phone calls to Mom to seek out your own hard-boiling techniques. But the Thai ginger-peanut filling? That I can bring to the table.

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by Sarah Steimer

    This meal was one-half what I was craving at the moment and one-half what I happened to have in the fridge. Is that the best way to cook or what? If the full recipe doesn't tickle your fancy, at least bookmark the sauce recipe --- I was loading more sauce into my wrap as I ate. Attractive, yes?

This meal was one-half what I was craving at the moment and one-half what I happened to have in the fridge. Is that the best way to cook or what? If the full recipe doesn’t tickle your fancy, at least bookmark the sauce recipe. It would be great for lettuce wraps, chicken salads or slopping up with leftover tofu like a pig (guiltyyyy).

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by Sarah Steimer

I love so many things about this dish. Quinoa with vegetables and sweet and sour dressing? That was good enough, but the baked tofu tossed in soy sauce knocked it out of the park. I'm also really into the idea of baking tofu, takes care of my stick-to-the-pan concerns with sautéing tofu.

I love so many things about this dish. Quinoa with vegetables and sweet and sour dressing? That was good enough, but the baked tofu tossed in soy sauce knocked it out of the park. I’m also really into the idea of baking tofu, takes care of my stick-to-the-pan concerns with sautéing tofu.


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by Caitlin Saniga

Thai coconut-cashew rice with bits of roasted pineapple

My family spent a couple of weeks in Thailand visiting my aunt and uncle when I was a freshman in high school, and since then that time has come to be known as The Trip of a Lifetime. I think Grandma may have even used that as the title of her photo journal of the trip. Point is: I’ve never been on a vacation like that one. We rode on more than 10 forms of transportation (airplane, speedboat, tuk-tuk, elephant … ); watched the sunrise from a small, remote island; toured temples of gold, emerald and broken china; and we ate some amazing food. Most notable, perhaps, was the availability of fresh fruit in Thailand. I drank a fruit smoothie with almost every meal, and we’d stop at roadside food vendors for small plastic bags of fresh pineapple or melon on long skewers. One of my favorite Thai dinners was a rice dish that included cashews, vegetables and sometimes chicken. It was simple, filling and not at all spicy, which was important at the time. When I prepare this dish, I’m reminded of some of my favorite food memories of Thailand.

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by Caitlin Saniga

Rose iced tea

I was so happily surprised by this tea, and so were the guests at a recent brunch at my mom’s house. Some were a bit skeptical of the strong rose fragrance of the tea, but the flavor is more delicate. Sipping on this tea is like drinking a rose! Rose water is popular in Middle Eastern recipes. Look for it at natural food stores, the ethnic food section of your grocery store or online. I picked up a bottle at Fairway in New York City, but before that, I’d been shopping around on Amazon and found some decent offerings.

  • 6 cups water
  • 1/4 cup honey (or to taste)
  • 5 single black tea bags
  • 1 cup rose water
  • 2 trays of ice cubes
  • Rose stems and mint sprigs for garnish

I froze rose petals in the ice cubes I used. If you decide to do the same, some tips: Fill the ice cube trays about halfway with water, add one or two petals to each slot, freeze, and then fill to the top with cold water. Freeze the cubes the rest of the way. This ensures that the petals don’t float to the top and become disconnected.

Bring the water to a boil in a large pot. Stir in the honey.

Remove the pot from heat, and add the tea bags. Let the tea steep about 10 minutes.

Remove the tea bags, and store the tea in the fridge for about 1 hour, or until it is mostly chilled. Add the rose water and ice cubes. Serve immediately in chilled glasses, garnished with rose stems and mint sprigs.

Makes about 10 servings.

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Thai lemongrass and ginger iced tea

by Sarah Steimer

Caitlin went Middle Eastern – and I went Far East. My iced tea also has an ingredient you’ll have to make a little effort searching for: fresh lemongrass. Head to the Asian market! Lucky for me, there’s a whole Asian food district off the Argyle stop on the Red Line, only blocks from my apartment. I would also bet you could find this at a good produce market or ethnic grocery store.

  • 3 stalks lemongrass, white parts only
  • 1 small knob ginger – about an inch and a half – sliced
  • 6 cups water
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 2 cups brewed black tea using two tea bags or two heaping teaspoons loose black tea (I used Darjeeling)

Using the butt of a knife, pound the lemongrass until lightly bruised. Slice into thin pieces – it doesn’t need to be perfect.

Keep the lemongrass-ginger syrup you don’t use! I have the rest of mine in the refrigerator for iced tea later this week. I’ll just have to make more black tea each time. In all, I probably made enough syrup for eight to 10 glasses of iced tea.

Add the lemongrass and sliced ginger to the six cups of water in a medium pot. Bring to a boil, lower the heat, and let simmer for 10 minutes. Add the sugar and let stand, covered, for 20 more minutes.

Strain the lemongrass and ginger from the water – which at this point is a watery, flavored simple syrup.

Fill half of each glass with the tea, then the rest with the lemongrass-ginger syrup, leaving room for ice. Mix and serve with a stalk of lemongrass (the green parts you didn’t use).

Makes four servings.

Recipe from: Appetite for China

Alfresco Refreshed is our spin on four traditional picnic staples: fruit salad, potato salad, iced tea and hamburgers. You can find all the recipes here.

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by Sarah Steimer

I do not like coconut, but for whatever reason it didn't bother me in the least in this dish.

  • 14-ounce package extra-firm tofu, drained
  • oil
  • 1-pound sweet potato, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1/2 cup vegetable broth or reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 14-ounce can “lite” coconut milk
  • 1-2 teaspoons red Thai curry paste (both this and the coconut milk can be found in with the Asian food items at your grocery store)
  • 8 ounces green beans, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons lime juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro

Cut tofu into 1-inch cubes and pat dry. Heat about 2 teaspoons of oil in a large nonstick skilled over medium-high heat. Make sure the pan is hot before you add the tofu and, yes, nonstick is important — I used a nonstick grill pan because we otherwise don’t own nonstick. Add tofu and cook, stirring every 2 or 3 minutes, until browned. Transfer to a plate.

There's no real reason for this picture I just sort of liked it even though it's too dark.

Heat another two teaspoons of oil over medium-high heat in a large pan. Add sweet potatoes and cook until browned. Add coconut milk, broth and curry paste (feel free to add more paste than suggested). Bring to a boil then reduce to a simmer, covered.

When the potato becomes tender (about 5 minutes), add the tofu, green beans and brown sugar. Return to a simmer and cook, stirring occasionally, until the beans are tender-crisp. Stir in lime juice and salt.

Sprinkle with cilantro and serve over rice.

Makes about four servings.

Recipe: Eating Well on a Budget

Photos: Sarah Steimer

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