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Posts Tagged ‘tofu’

by Sarah Steimer

Marinated tofu with peanuts and charred bean sprouts

This dish came together so easily and had fantastic textures between the tofu, bean sprouts and peanuts. Definitely do not skip the addition of a lime wedge, that little blast of tart citrus juice really elevates the dish and cuts some of the saltiness of the lime and peanuts.

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by Sarah Steimer

Avocado, tofu and spicy peanut rice spring rolls

Adding the sauce straight to the rice — rather than serving it on the side — make these spring rolls great for one-the-go action. It may take you a few tries to master the spring roll wrap, but it’s a really fun way to interact with your food. Just be sure to put the herbs down first so they can be showcased through the translucent rice paper.

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by Sarah Stiemer

Carrot, kale and tofu salad with spicy peanut dressing

This salad is a great side dish, but I wanted to make it my main course. To do so, I knew I needed to add a protein. I opted for tofu, but some chickpeas would also be great in this salad.

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by Sarah Steimer

Rice wrappers are the best. They make for an incredible base for a simple, almost no-cook, quick meal. But fair warning, they do take a little practice to get perfect (and I do not have a perfect roll just yet).

Rice wrappers are the best. They make for an incredible base for a simple, almost no-cook, quick meal. But fair warning, they do take a little practice to get perfect (and I do not have a perfect roll just yet).

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by Sarah Steimer

    This meal was one-half what I was craving at the moment and one-half what I happened to have in the fridge. Is that the best way to cook or what? If the full recipe doesn't tickle your fancy, at least bookmark the sauce recipe --- I was loading more sauce into my wrap as I ate. Attractive, yes?

This meal was one-half what I was craving at the moment and one-half what I happened to have in the fridge. Is that the best way to cook or what? If the full recipe doesn’t tickle your fancy, at least bookmark the sauce recipe. It would be great for lettuce wraps, chicken salads or slopping up with leftover tofu like a pig (guiltyyyy).

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by Sarah Steimer

I love so many things about this dish. Quinoa with vegetables and sweet and sour dressing? That was good enough, but the baked tofu tossed in soy sauce knocked it out of the park. I'm also really into the idea of baking tofu, takes care of my stick-to-the-pan concerns with sautéing tofu.

I love so many things about this dish. Quinoa with vegetables and sweet and sour dressing? That was good enough, but the baked tofu tossed in soy sauce knocked it out of the park. I’m also really into the idea of baking tofu, takes care of my stick-to-the-pan concerns with sautéing tofu.


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by Sarah Steimer

I served this dish over rice, but made one grand mistake: That was all I had for dinner. This is definitely a dish to be served as an appetizer or alongside a number of other "bites." It's delicious, but doesn't go very far.

I served this dish over rice, but made one grand mistake: That was all I had for dinner. This is definitely a dish to be served as an appetizer or alongside a number of other “bites.” It’s delicious, but doesn’t go very far.

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by Sarah Steimer

Bill and I made pad thai for Valentine's Day last year --- and the result was pretty awful. The amount of fish sauce that recipe called for totally overwhelmed the dish and tasted like a dirty ocean. This Martha Stewart recipe, however, had one of the shortest list of sauce ingredients: only three. Looks like simple is best for pad thai.

Bill and I made pad thai for Valentine’s Day last year — and the result was pretty awful. The amount of fish sauce that recipe called for totally overwhelmed the dish and tasted like a dirty ocean. This Martha Stewart recipe, however, had one of the shortest list of sauce ingredients: only three. Looks like simple is best for pad thai.

  • 8 ounces dried, wide and flat rice noodles
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice (from about 1 lime)
  • 3 tablespoons light soy sauce
  • vegetable oil
  • 1/2 14-ounce package of extra-firm tofu, cut into small cubes and patted dry with a paper towel
  • 3 scallions thinly sliced, white and green parts separated
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1/3 cup julienned carrots
  • 1/3 cup julienned daikon radish
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1/2 cup fresh cilantro
  • 1/4 cup roasted and salted peanuts, chopped

NOTE: This recipe requires some quick working over the stove, so it’s very important to get all of your ingredients ready before you begin cooking.

Soak the noodles according to package directions.

Whisk together the brown sugar, lime juice and soy sauce in a small sauce pan. Warm the sauce over very low heat until the sugar dissolves. Turn the heat off and cover to keep warm.

Heat either a large pan or a wok over medium-high heat until hot. Add a couple teaspoons of vegetable oil and allow the oil to get very hot, but not smoke. NOTE: A nonstick pan does work best for cooking tofu, but it is not necessary. If you do not have a nonstick pan, be sure to get the pan and oil very hot so the tofu does not stick.

I've used both a wok and a regular (not nonstick) pan for this meal and both turned out great.

I’ve used both a wok and a regular (not nonstick) pan for this meal and both turned out great.

Carefully add the tofu to the hot oil, which will pop when it meets the remaining water in the tofu. Cook the tofu over medium heat, occasionally tossing until the pieces are golden. Remove the tofu from the pan and set aside.

If needed, add a touch more oil to the hot pan. Add the onion whites, garlic, carrots and daikon. Cook over medium heat for about 30 seconds. Push the vegetables to one side of the pan.

Add the eggs to the clear side of the pan (do not worry if the egg trickles into the veggies a bit). Use a spatula to move the eggs around, cooking until just set. Remove the eggs from the pan and set aside.

Add the drained rice noodles and the warm soy sauce mixture to the vegetables in the pan. Toss everything quickly to coat. Add the eggs — breaking them up as you go — and the tofu.

Serve the pad thai topped with the onion greens, cilantro and peanuts.

Makes about 4 servings.

Recipe adapted from: Martha Stewart

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by Caitlin Saniga

The peanuts, basil and cilantro gave this dish a nice, fresh Thai vibe. And the peanut sauce was superb!

Rice:

  • 2 cups water
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup brown basmati rice

Sauce:

  • 3 tablespoons peanut butter
  • 2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
  • 1 garlic clove, minced finely
  • 2 teaspoons soy sauce
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne
  • 1/2 teaspoon olive oil
  • salt

Everything else:

  • 1 pound green cabbage, cut into 1/4-inch ribbons
  • salt
  • olive oil
  • 1 10-ounce box extra-firm tofu, diced into 1/2-inch cubes
  • pepper
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
  • 1 tablespoon chopped basil
  • 1 tablespoon roasted peanuts

In a medium sauce pan with a lid, combine the water, salt and rice, and bring to a boil. Stir once, cover and reduce heat to low. Simmer for 50 minutes, untouched (That means no peaking!). Remove from heat and let stand, covered.

For the sauce, combine all of the ingredients except the salt, adding 2 to 4 tablespoons of warm water to make it the consistency you wish. Add 1/4 teaspoon salt, taste, and adjust seasonings.

Set a steaming basket in a saucepan over boiling water. Lay the cabbage over the bottom, sprinkling lightly with salt. Cover and steam until the cabbage is bright green and tender, 8 to 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, coat the bottom of a large pan with olive oil and warm over medium heat. Add the tofu and cook until the edges are golden and crispy, 6 to 8 minutes. Season with slat and pepper.

Spoon helpings of rice onto each plate and top with the cabbage and tofu. Drizzle peanut sauce on top, and garnish with cilantro, basil and peanuts. Serve warm.

Makes 2 servings.

Recipe adapted from: Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone

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by Caitlin Saniga

These Korean-style fried dumplings are called mondu. They’re similar to pot stickers, wontons or gyoza.

For dumplings:

  • 1 (14 ounce) package firm tofu, rinsed and drained and cut into chunks
  • 1 1/2 cup fermented kimchi
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil
  • 1 pound ground lean pork
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 3 green onions, sliced thinly
  • 2 packs 40-count wonton wrappers
  • canola oil

For dipping sauce:

  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar
  • sprinkle of cayenne pepper

The tofu in this recipe acts as a bonding agent, mellows the kimchi flavor and gives the filling a smoother texture than a meat-and-kimchi-based filling would. For stronger flavor, add more kimchi to the mix.

Working in batches if necessary, combine the tofu, kimchi, garlic and sesame oil in the bowl of a food processor. Pulse until the tofu has broken down and the mixture is a pale pink color from the kimchi juice, 15-20 seconds.

Transfer the mixture to a large mixing bowl, add the pork, and season to taste with salt and pepper. Use your hands or a spoon to thoroughly combine everything.

Before frying the dumplings, set out a cooling rack and set 1 or 2 paper towels on top. Once they’ve been cooked, let them cool on the rack for about 5 minutes before serving them.

Add the green onions and give the mixture another good stir.

To assemble the dumplings, scoop a rounded teaspoonful of the mixture into the center of a wonton wrapper. Working from a small bowl of water, wet the edges of the wrapper with a fingertip. Fold the wrapper lengthwise, creating a rectangle, enclosing the filling. Seal the top edge, press the air out of the sides, and seal the sides. Re-wet the top edge of the wrapper. Fold the top edge on itself as you would with a fan, creating three or four small folds. Seal the folds once more with water, if necessary. The dumplings should resemble a purse shape. Line up the assembled dumplings on a baking sheet.

Once all of the dumplings are assembled, pour just enough canola oil into a frying pan to cover the bottom. Warm the oil over medium heat. To test whether the oil is warm enough for frying, wet your fingertips and fling the water over the oil, careful not to burn yourself. If the oil is ready, the water will bubble and make a popping sound when it touches the oil.

This recipe could easily be halved to serve 4 to 6 people as a dinner course. I liked making the big batch because I could freeze the extra dumplings for later use, and, my, are they addicting! You’ll want more later.

Working in batches of 6 to 8, use metal tongs to place the dumplings in the oil. Cook for about a minute, or until the bottom of the dumplings are golden brown. Flip the dumplings onto another side, and cook until that side is golden brown. Repeat with the remaining side. Use the tongs to transfer the dumplings to a paper towel-lined cooling rack. Repeat this process with the remaining dumplings, or transfer the raw dumplings to a sealed container or freezer-safe zip-top bag and store in the freezer for up to 1 week.

To make the dipping sauce, combine the soy sauce, vinegar and cayenne pepper in a small dish.

Serve the warm dumplings alongside the sauce.

Makes 80.

Gyoza

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