Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘wine’

by Caitlin Saniga

Mushroom and wild rice soup

I would have made a great Minnesotan. Mushroom and wild rice soup, a Minnesota classic, is one of my favorite comfort foods.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

by Caitlin Saniga

Peach white Zinfandel ice cream

Behold: the only ice cream cone I’ve ever been carded for. When I asked the girl working the counter which flavor of wine ice cream she’d recommend, she replied, “I couldn’t tell you. You have to be 21 to try it.”

(more…)

Read Full Post »

by Sarah Steimer

Spanish-style duck meatballs with red pepper sauce

My friend Drew made these meatballs at a restaurant he used to work at in Chicago, and they were always awesome. When I got my hands on some ground duck — and I knew this meatball guide was on the horizon — I shot Drew a text and he was kind enough to not only send me the recipe, but convert it down from massive restaurant portions.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

by Sarah Steimer

Chard become one of my favorite greens this summer, and I ate this open-face chard sandwich often. I read somewhere this year that chard would replace kale as the "trendy green" of 2013. That's a ridiculous thing to say, but I do sort of hope that's the case because I'd love to see chard on more restaurant menus.

Chard become one of my favorite greens this summer, and I ate this open-face chard sandwich often. I read somewhere this year that chard would replace kale as the “trendy green” of 2013. That’s a ridiculous thing to say, but I do sort of hope that’s the case because I’d love to see chard on more restaurant menus.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

by Caitlin Saniga

What goes better with quiche than a nice little side salad?

For crust:

  • 1 cup flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup ice water

For filling:

  • 5 strips bacon
  • 1 cup chopped tomatoes, seeds removed (from 1 medium tomato)
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2 cup chopped yellow onion (from 1 small onion)
  • 1/4 cup white wine
  • 1/4 cup chicken stock
  • 1 teaspoon rice wine vinegar
  • 5 eggs
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream
  • 1 tablespoon chopped basil
  • 1 tablespoon chopped parsley
  • 1 cup chopped arugula
  • 1/2 cup crumbled feta

No need to roll out the dough for this crust. Just use the palms of your hands and your fingertips to press the dough into the shape of the pan. It’s likely to be a little uneven, but don’t sweat it!

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

To make the crust, combine the flour and salt in a medium bowl. Use a fork to whisk together. In a separate bowl, whisk together the oil and water. Pour the liquid mixture into the dry mixture and use a fork to combine. Use your hands to press the dough into a 9-inch pie pan. Refrigerate while you prepare the filling.

To make the filling, start by cooking the bacon in a large skillet over medium heat. Reserve 1 tablespoon of the grease for this recipe. Place the bacon on paper towels until it cools, then crumble it. Cook the tomatoes in the reserved tablespoon of bacon grease for 5 minutes. Sprinkle the sugar over top. Add the onions and cook for 5 more minutes. Deglaze the pan with wine. Simmer until the wine is reduced by half. Add the chicken stock and vinegar. Simmer until the liquid is reduced by half. Remove the pan from heat. Add the herbs and bacon, and allow to cool completely.

In a large bowl, whisk the eggs. Add the cream and gently whisk together. Mix in the bacon mixture and arugula.  Pour the mixture into the pie shell. Top with feta. Bake for 35-40 minutes, or until the egg has set.

Makes 8 servings.

Crust recipe: Food.com

* Power Trio is our July guide that features BLT recipe ideas — including bacon, leafy greens and tomatoes, minus the two slices of bread. See all of our Power Trio BLT recipes here.

Read Full Post »

by Caitlin Saniga and Sarah Steimer

Wine and chocolate? Can’t complain. Normally wine is paired with a full meal, or various aspects of the meal. We decided to take that information and pair red wines with different types of chocolate. These pairings are a great idea for a small party — or just for you and that hunk of burning love that is lucky enough to call you his or her own. Or it can be just for you (how do you suppose we tested out this guide?).

And please note: We’re not experts.

Red zinfandel and ginger-orange spiced dark chocolate

Red zinf and spicy dark chocolate

The wine: Red zinfandels have a medium to heavy body with spicy, sometimes fruity notes.

The pairing: Red zinfs pair well with desserts that have spice — think gingerbreads and carrot cake. With that in mind, I went with a ginger-orange dark chocolate.

— S

————————————————————————————————

Pinot noir with caramel milk chocolate

Merlot with caramel milk chocolate


The wine: Pinot noir is a light red wine with notes of vanilla, strawberry and raspberry and pairs well with milk chocolates. It can range in color from cherry to purple.

The pairing: This wine is a natural dessert partner with creme brulee, a custard topped with caramelized sugar. The vanilla aromas pair nicely with the caramel chocolate.

— C

————————————————————————————————

Cabernet sauvignon with espresso chocolate

Cabernet Sauvignon with espresso chocolate.

The wine: Cabernets can be a nice, mellow wine. They often have notes of currants, along with oak and a bit of vanilla.

The pairing: When served with desserts, Cabernet sauvignon matches up well with treats that have a coffee flavoring — which is why I chose a chocolate that has an espresso flavoring. (Could you imagine this with tiramisu? Sounds perfect.)

— S

————————————————————————————————

Shiraz with raspberry dark chocolate

The wine: Shiraz has aromas of blackberry, plum, and pepper. It can be

Shiraz with raspberry dark chocolate

prepared in a fruity style, which many sweet wine drinkers like.

The pairing: With its dark berry and plum flavors, this wine pairs nicely with the fruitiness and tinge of bitterness of raspberry dark chocolate. Don’t like raspberries? I was tempted to try blackberry and blueberry dark chocolates I spotted at the store.

— C

Sources: WineIntro.com and Savory.tv

Read Full Post »

by Sarah Steimer

Olive Garden would just die if it knew ravioli didn't need to be heavy and salty.

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 shallot, finely chopped (about 1/4 cup) — I used green onion
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 2 1/4 cups shelled fresh or thawed frozen peas
  • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons dry white wine
  • Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1/4 cup shredded Parmesan
  • 40 wonton wrappers (3 1/2 inches each)
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten
  • a few tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 4 fresh mint leaves, thinly sliced

    I'm not perfect like Marth Stewart, I added cheese. Oh wait she went to jail. Also not perfect.

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until translucent. Add garlic and cook until soft. Add peas, wine, 1 cup water, pepper and. Simmer until liquid has almost evaporate

d and peas are tender, 12 to 15 minutes. Let cool slightly.Puree pea mixture in a food processor. Brush edges of wrappers with egg. Place 1 tablespoon puree in centers of the wrappers. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with a dry wrapper; seal edges. Trim using a 3-inch round cutter (not totally necessary).

Working in batches, cook ravioli in salted simmering water until they are soft and rise to the surface. Melt butter in a medium skillet over medium heat and add ravioli to skillet, and cook until butter is frothy and ravioli is coated. Sprinkle with mint and serve immediately.

Makes about four servings.

Recipe adapted from: Martha Stewart

Photos: Sarah Steimer

Read Full Post »