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Posts Tagged ‘wonton wrappers’

by Caitlin Saniga

This recipe was inspired by some leftover cream cheese icing and a sweet potato I didn’t know what to do with. Don’t you love using what you have?

Wontons:

  • 1 medium sweet potato
  • 1 teaspoon orange zest, from 1 orange
  • 2 tablespoons orange juice, from 1 orange
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 24 wonton wrappers
  • canola oil

Cream cheese frosting sauce:

  • 2 ounces cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into pieces, room temperature
  • 3/4 cup confectioners’ sugar

For these fried wontons, I decided to go with the simple one-fold method. When they were finished, they almost looked like little empenadas. Heyyy… maybe there’s a guide idea there.

To make the wontons:

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with foil. Prick the sweet potato all over with a fork, and place it on the baking sheet. Bake the sweet potato for 30 minutes or until it has softened and the skin starts to pull away. Let the sweet potato cool for 5 to 10 minutes before pulling away the peel. Cut it into pieces and add it to the bowl of a food processor.

Add the orange zest, orange juice, vanilla, cinnamon and honey to the bowl of a food processor. Pulse until there aren’t any bumps in the mixture. Adjust seasonings if necessary.

Assemble the wontons by placing a rounded teaspoonful of the sweet potato mixture in the center of each wonton wrapper. Use a wet fingertip to trace the edge of the wonton wrapper, fold the wonton as desired and press the wet edges to seal. Repeat this process with the remaining wrappers.

Pour canola oil into a large pan so that it’s about 1/2 inch thick. Place the pan over medium heat and let it sit until it’s hot, about 5 minutes. In the meantime, prepare a cooling rack by covering it with paper towels.

To check whether the oil is hot enough, you can carefully flick a few drops of water at the oil. If they sizzle and pop immediately, the oil’s ready.

Add 6 of the wontons to the pan, and allow them to cook until they bubble up and turn-golden brown on the bottoms, no more than 20 seconds. Flip the wontons and cook for no more than 20 seconds longer. Using a pair of metal tongs, transfer the wontons to the cooling racks. Repeat these steps to finish the wontons.

If you can’t tell by now, I’m a big fan of frying wontons. I’m not super into deep-fried vegetables or fried chicken, but I love a good crispy wonton.

To make the cream cheese frosting sauce:

In the bowl of an electric mixer, beat the cream cheese and vanilla until light and creamy, about 2 minutes. With the mixer on medium speed, add the butter, beating until incorporated.

Reduce the mixer speed to low. Gradually add the sugar, beating until incorporated. Transfer the frosting to a small microwave-safe container and warm it in the microwave 10-30 seconds, until it’s soft and somewhat runny.

Serve warm alongside wontons.

Makes 24.

* Want One? is our October guide that pays homage to the wonton, a traditionally steamed, fried, baked or boiled dumpling that can be filled with an array of goodies. We’ll feature meatless, meat-full and dessert renditions.

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by Caitlin Saniga

For this meatless wonton, I chose a handful of autumn veggies: kale, carrots, mushrooms and green onions. The funny thing is: Sarah and I came up with this guide theme because we both had some leftover wonton wrappers we needed to use. We had no idea it would spark so much creativity! What would you put inside a wonton wrapper?

Wontons:

  • 4 ounces baby bella mushrooms, wiped clean
  • 1 large carrot, trimmed and peeled
  • 1 large kale leaf, sliced very thinly
  • 1 large clove garlic, trimmed and peeled
  • 3 green onions, chopped finely
  • 1/2 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • salt
  • 24 wonton wrappers
  • canola oil

Dipping sauce:

  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons rice wine vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 garlic glove, peeled and smashed
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • pinch of cayenne
  • 2 teaspoons toasted sesame seeds

I experimented with folding styles for these wontons, pressing three edges of a circle wonton together to create a triangular dumpling. You could also simply fold a circle in half over the filling and press to seal.

To make the wontons:

Put the mushrooms, carrot and garlic in the bowl of a food processor. Pulse several times until the ingredients are finely chopped. Transfer to a small bowl, and mix in the kale, green onions, olive oil and a few dashes of salt.

Assemble the wontons by placing a rounded teaspoonful of the mushroom mixture in the center of each wonton wrapper. Use a wet fingertip to trace the edge of the wonton wrapper, fold the wonton as desired and press the wet edges to seal. Repeat this process with the remaining wrappers.

Pour canola oil into a large pan so that it’s about 1/2 inch thick. Place the pan over medium heat and let it sit until it’s hot, about 5 minutes. In the meantime, prepare a cooling rack by covering it with paper towels.

To check whether the oil is hot enough, you can carefully flick a few drops of water at the oil. If they sizzle and pop immediately, the oil’s ready.

Add 6 of the wontons to the pan, and allow them to cook until they bubble up and turn-golden brown on the bottoms, no more than 20 seconds. Flip the wontons and cook for no more than 20 seconds longer. Using a pair of metal tongs, transfer the wontons to the cooling racks. Repeat these steps to finish the wontons.

The potent mix of flavors in the ginger-sesame sauce would also be great with pasta or stir-fry. It’s lick-the-bowl-clean good!

To make the sesame-ginger sauce:

Place all of the ingredients except for the sesame seeds in the bowl of a food processor. Pulse until the ingredients have thoroughly combined, about 10 seconds. Pour the sauce into a small dish and top with the toasted sesame seeds.

Serve immediately.

Makes 24.

* Want One? is our October guide that pays homage to the wonton, a traditionally steamed, fried, baked or boiled dumpling that can be filled with an array of goodies. We’ll feature meatless, meat-full and dessert renditions.

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by Caitlin Saniga

Eddie has surprised me on numerous occasions by making these cute little lasagnas when I come home for my dinner break. Because he makes them in a mini cupcake pan, he calls them “lasagna cupcakes.” You can also make these in the larger cupcake pans, resulting in more substantial lasagnas with less of the crispy noodle part around the edges.

  • 14 ounces kielbasa, sliced into 1/2-inch rounds and then quartered
  • olive oil, for brushing the pan
  • 1 48-count pack of wonton wrappers
  • 1 cup marinara sauce
  • 1 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • basil for garnish

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.

Crisp up the kielbasa in a lightly oiled medium pan over medium heat, about 3 minutes. Set aside.

Use a bit of oil to lightly grease 2 mini muffin pans. Place two wonton wrappers in each cup, turning the second wrapper so that it’s offset from the first one. Place a kielbasa slice in each wonton cup, then top with a bit of marinara sauce and cheese. Repeat these layers once more, topping generously with cheese on the top layer.

Bake the lasagnas for about 20 minutes, or until the cheese and wonton wrapper begin to turn golden-brown.

Remove the trays from the oven and allow to cool on racks for about 10 minutes. Garnish with basil, and serve immediately or store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 4 days.

Makes 24.

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by Caitlin Saniga

These Korean-style fried dumplings are called mondu. They’re similar to pot stickers, wontons or gyoza.

For dumplings:

  • 1 (14 ounce) package firm tofu, rinsed and drained and cut into chunks
  • 1 1/2 cup fermented kimchi
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil
  • 1 pound ground lean pork
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 3 green onions, sliced thinly
  • 2 packs 40-count wonton wrappers
  • canola oil

For dipping sauce:

  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar
  • sprinkle of cayenne pepper

The tofu in this recipe acts as a bonding agent, mellows the kimchi flavor and gives the filling a smoother texture than a meat-and-kimchi-based filling would. For stronger flavor, add more kimchi to the mix.

Working in batches if necessary, combine the tofu, kimchi, garlic and sesame oil in the bowl of a food processor. Pulse until the tofu has broken down and the mixture is a pale pink color from the kimchi juice, 15-20 seconds.

Transfer the mixture to a large mixing bowl, add the pork, and season to taste with salt and pepper. Use your hands or a spoon to thoroughly combine everything.

Before frying the dumplings, set out a cooling rack and set 1 or 2 paper towels on top. Once they’ve been cooked, let them cool on the rack for about 5 minutes before serving them.

Add the green onions and give the mixture another good stir.

To assemble the dumplings, scoop a rounded teaspoonful of the mixture into the center of a wonton wrapper. Working from a small bowl of water, wet the edges of the wrapper with a fingertip. Fold the wrapper lengthwise, creating a rectangle, enclosing the filling. Seal the top edge, press the air out of the sides, and seal the sides. Re-wet the top edge of the wrapper. Fold the top edge on itself as you would with a fan, creating three or four small folds. Seal the folds once more with water, if necessary. The dumplings should resemble a purse shape. Line up the assembled dumplings on a baking sheet.

Once all of the dumplings are assembled, pour just enough canola oil into a frying pan to cover the bottom. Warm the oil over medium heat. To test whether the oil is warm enough for frying, wet your fingertips and fling the water over the oil, careful not to burn yourself. If the oil is ready, the water will bubble and make a popping sound when it touches the oil.

This recipe could easily be halved to serve 4 to 6 people as a dinner course. I liked making the big batch because I could freeze the extra dumplings for later use, and, my, are they addicting! You’ll want more later.

Working in batches of 6 to 8, use metal tongs to place the dumplings in the oil. Cook for about a minute, or until the bottom of the dumplings are golden brown. Flip the dumplings onto another side, and cook until that side is golden brown. Repeat with the remaining side. Use the tongs to transfer the dumplings to a paper towel-lined cooling rack. Repeat this process with the remaining dumplings, or transfer the raw dumplings to a sealed container or freezer-safe zip-top bag and store in the freezer for up to 1 week.

To make the dipping sauce, combine the soy sauce, vinegar and cayenne pepper in a small dish.

Serve the warm dumplings alongside the sauce.

Makes 80.

Gyoza

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by Sarah Steimer

Olive Garden would just die if it knew ravioli didn't need to be heavy and salty.

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 shallot, finely chopped (about 1/4 cup) — I used green onion
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 2 1/4 cups shelled fresh or thawed frozen peas
  • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons dry white wine
  • Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1/4 cup shredded Parmesan
  • 40 wonton wrappers (3 1/2 inches each)
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten
  • a few tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 4 fresh mint leaves, thinly sliced

    I'm not perfect like Marth Stewart, I added cheese. Oh wait she went to jail. Also not perfect.

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until translucent. Add garlic and cook until soft. Add peas, wine, 1 cup water, pepper and. Simmer until liquid has almost evaporate

d and peas are tender, 12 to 15 minutes. Let cool slightly.Puree pea mixture in a food processor. Brush edges of wrappers with egg. Place 1 tablespoon puree in centers of the wrappers. Sprinkle with cheese. Top with a dry wrapper; seal edges. Trim using a 3-inch round cutter (not totally necessary).

Working in batches, cook ravioli in salted simmering water until they are soft and rise to the surface. Melt butter in a medium skillet over medium heat and add ravioli to skillet, and cook until butter is frothy and ravioli is coated. Sprinkle with mint and serve immediately.

Makes about four servings.

Recipe adapted from: Martha Stewart

Photos: Sarah Steimer

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by Caitlin Saniga

These dumplings were pretty good when they were warm, but then again, they were good the next day when they were cold, too.

Dumplings:

  • 1 cup frozen shelled edamame
  • 1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon dark sesame oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 20 square or round wonton wrappers
  • cooking spray
  • 1/2 cup water, divided

Dipping sauce:

  • 2 tablespoon chopped green onions
  • 2  low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon honey

Keep the edamame filling on one half of the wonton wrapper. There's better distribution that way.

Cook edamame according to package directions and drain. Rinse edamame with cold water; drain well. Combine edamame, juice, sesame oil, cumin, and salt in a food processor and process until smooth.

Working with 1 wonton wrapper at a time (cover remaining wrappers with a damp towel to prevent drying), spoon about 1 teaspoon edamame mixture onto one half of each wrapper. Moisten edges of dough with water; fold opposite corners to form a triangle, pinching points to seal. Place dumplings on a large baking sheet sprinkled with cornstarch.

Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Coat pan with cooking spray. Arrange half of dumplings in a single layer in the pan and reduce heat to medium. Cook 1 minute or until bottoms begin to brown; turn. Add 1/4 cup water to pan; cover. Cook 30 seconds and uncover. Cook 1 minute or until liquid evaporates. Repeat procedure with remaining dumplings and water. Serve immediately with sauce.

To prepare sauce:

Combine the first 3 ingredients in a small bowl, stirring with a whisk.

Makes 20.

Recipe adapted from: RecipeGirl.com

Photo: Caitlin Saniga

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