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Posts Tagged ‘sweet potatoes’

by Caitlin Saniga

Roasted sweet potatoes with chickpeas, dried cranberries and pesto

I love all of the opportunity a plain roasted sweet potato presents. The addition of pesto, dried cranberries, toasted walnuts, quinoa and chickpeas make it magical.

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by Caitlin Saniga

Sweet potato balls with smoky cashew aioli

Aioli is a sauce traditionally made with olive, oil, lemon, garlic and egg yolks, but this one’s a little different in that it includes softened raw cashews instead of egg yolks. Plus, smoked paprika is like magic pixie dust. Don’t skimp and grab for regular paprika. Buy a little bottle of the smoked version, and I promise you won’t regret it. I’ll be looking for new ways to incorporate it, so stay tuned. My first experiment was to add it to hummus — delicious!

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by Caitlin Saniga

I've been all about dishes that liven up cold-weather staples lately. Cilantro and lime add lots of brightness and color to a soup that has lots of warm flavors, a nice combination.

I’ve been all about dishes that liven up cold-weather staples lately. Cilantro and lime add lots of brightness and color to a soup that has lots of warm flavors, a nice combination.

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by Caitlin Saniga

Sweet potato salad with olives, edamame and cashews

I was inspired to come up with this recipe when I read about the unlikely combination of sweet potatoes and olives in a recent issue of Vegetarian Times, which suggested that the sweetness of the potatoes can be balanced with the tangyness of the olives. Spot on, VT. I added some edamame and scallions for color and some cashews for crunch, and a blanket of balsamic vinaigrette sealed the deal. This dish was delicious.


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Every family has its staples and traditions at Thanksgiving, and that’s part of what makes the holiday great. But every once in a while, it’s not just the bread for stuffing that gets stale. If you’re looking for some inspiration for a new dish or two, try our guide! We collected some of our favorite recipes from the past few years.

Should you try any of these recipes, please let us know. We would love to hear that we gained a spot at your Thanksgiving table.

— Sarah and Caitlin

Staples

Ideas for Thanksgiving basics: stuffing and turkey.

Ideas for Thanksgiving basics: stuffing and turkey.

Green beans

Our green bean recipes include a fresh take on a canned classic.

Our green bean recipes include a fresh take on a canned classic.

Potatoes

Roast 'em, mash 'em, boil 'em. Whatever you do — eat your potatoes.

Roast ‘em, mash ‘em, boil ‘em. Whatever you do — eat your potatoes.

Carrots

Carrots at Thanksgiving? Helps to make sure your eyesight is perfect for watching the football game.

Carrots at Thanksgiving? Helps to make sure your eyesight is perfect for watching the football game.

Sweet potatoes

The only thing that could be better than a regular potato — is a sweet potato.

The only thing that could be better than a regular potato — is a sweet potato.

Brussels sprouts

Brussels have become a popular Thanksgiving side, so make some room for the little cabbages.

Brussels have become a popular Thanksgiving side, so make some room for the little cabbages.

Cranberry sauce

Sure, the stuff in the can ain't bad — if you don't mind seeing the can rings on your food (but really, we wouldn't judge).

Sure, the stuff in the can ain’t bad — if you don’t mind seeing the can rings on your food (but really, we wouldn’t judge).

Rolls and biscuits

Hey, it's Thanksgiving — the more starch the better.

Hey, it’s Thanksgiving — the more starch the better.

Beverages

You've got a long day ahead — and we all know what could help speed it up.

You’ve got a long day ahead — and we all know what could help speed it up.

Pie

And to wrap it all up: the fabulous pies.

And to wrap it all up: the fabulous pies.

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by Caitlin Saniga

Ever since Sarah tried this *beautiful* roasted sweet potato with Brussles sprouts, etc., I've been dying to come up with a roasted sweet potato recipe on my own. This rendition was based on what I had in my fridge and pantry: some salsa, leftover cabbage, green onions, tortilla chips and kidney beans. Not a bad combination!

Ever since Sarah tried this *beautiful* roasted sweet potato with Brussels sprouts, etc., I’ve been dying to come up with a roasted sweet potato recipe on my own. This rendition was based on what I had in my fridge and pantry: some salsa, leftover cabbage, feta, green onions, tortilla chips and kidney beans. Not a bad combination!


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by Caitlin Saniga

Eggplant and sweet potato korma pizza

Using bottled korma sauce saves time and money and make this pizza perfect for weeknight dinners or quick weekend snacks.


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by Caitlin Saniga

Wilted creesy greens with bacon and sweet potatoes

If you’re curious, there don’t seem to be many recipes for creasy greens out there. Here in Southwest Virginia, they tend to be served simply with a bit of bacon grease, vinegar and sugar, like this man from Bland County describes in his video. (I’m still confused whether he’s talking about watercress or creasy greens, but you’ll get the idea.) I added onions and sweet potatoes and mixed in a bit of crispy bacon for my dish, which seemed to suit the floral-scented creasy greens well.

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by Caitlin Saniga

Buttercup squash and sweet potatoes with tangy chermoula

Chermoula is a tangy, spicy Moroccan marinade typically served with fish, but it also goes well with sweet vegetables. I chose buttercup squash and sweet potatoes, but beets, carrots and fingerling potatoes would also be great.

Vegetables:

  • 2 medium sweet potatoes, peel scrubbed, and chopped into 1/4-inch half-moons
  • 1 medium butternut squash, seeded, peeled, and chopped into 2-inch planks
  • extra-virgin olive oil
  • salt and pepper

Chermoula:

  • 4 garlic cloves, smashed, peeled, trimmed and roughly chopped
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 cup roughly chopped cilantro
  • 1/3 cup roughly chopped parsley
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons paprika
  • 1/4 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • juice of 1 large lemon
Chermoula is a Moroccan marinade typically served with fish, but it also goes well with sweet vegetables. I chose buttercup squash and sweet potatoes, but beets, carrots and fingerling potatoes would also be great.

Ever seen a buttercup squash before? It’s kind of crazy looking. To break it down, I used a sharp knife to cut it in half, then scooped out the seeds. From there, I cut it into manageable slices and chopped off the peels. Then I sliced it into bite-size pieces.

Heat the oven to 400 degrees. In a large bowl, toss the vegetables in just enough oil to coat. Arrange in a single layer on 2 baking sheets. Grind fresh salt and pepper over top to taste. Roast for 20 minutes, then flip the vegetables. Cook an additional 10 minutes, or until everything’s golden brown and tender.

Meanwhile, prepare the chermoula by placing all of the ingredients in the bowl of a food processor.

I like to serve sauces and dressings on the side, so everyone can choose how much to use on their own plate.

I like to serve sauces and dressings on the side, so everyone can choose how much to use on their own plate.

Pulse until smooth, take a taste and adjust seasonings to your preference.

Serve the vegetables hot with fresh chermoula drizzle over top.

Makes 4-6 side dish servings.

Recipe adapted from: Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone

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by Sarah Steimer

Kale on pizza is phenomenal. It gets super crispy and helps to highlight the spices you use. I've done a similar pizza using blue cheese in place of mozzarella as well - and it was also pretty fantastic.

Kale on pizza is phenomenal. It gets super crispy and helps to highlight the spices you use. I’ve done a similar pizza using blue cheese in place of mozzarella as well – and it was also pretty fantastic.

For the crust (makes two pizzas)

  • 1 cup very warm water
  • 1 package (2 1/4 teaspoons) dry active yeast
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

Whisk together the warm water and yeast until the yeast has dissolved. Let sit for about 10 minutes.

Whisk in the olive oil, honey and salt until all ingredients have dissolved.

Working with either a standing mixer, a food processor — both fitted with a dough attachment — or with a wooden spoon and your own two hands, add one cup of the whole wheat flour. Add the remaining wheat flour, followed by the all-purpose flour a little at a time, or until a stiff ball forms. You may not use all the flour.

Knead the dough on a lightly floured surface for 2-3 minutes.

Use olive oil to lightly grease a large bowl and roll the ball of dough in the bowl to coat the dough as well. Cover the bowl, with the dough inside, with a dish towel. Let rise in a warm area for 45 minutes to 1 hour.

TIP: I like to turn the oven on to its lowest setting and then turn it off for a few minutes before placing the dough in the oven to rise. The extra warmth helps the yeast.

For the sauce:

  • 1 6-ounce can of tomato paste
  • 1/2 8-ounce can tomato sauce (the rest can be placed in a baggie in the freezer)
  • 2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 1-2 teaspoons sugar (depends on how sweet you like your sauce)
  • 1 teaspoon white vinegar (really almost any vinegar will do)
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • salt and pepper, to taste

Combine all ingredients in a small sauce pan over low heat. Bring to a simmer, stirring occasionally. Adjust seasonings to taste and remove from the heat.

For the pizza

  • 3 large kale leaves, rinsed, ribs removed and roughly chopped
  • 3-4 slices uncooked bacon, diced
  • 1/4 cup diced onion
  • 1 ball fresh mozzarella, roughly chopped
  • 1/2 small sweet potato, peeled
  • 1 tablespoon (or more) crushed red pepper
  • 1/2 (or more) sauce recipe
  • 1/2 pizza dough recipe

Add a few tablespoons of water to a small skillet. Add the kale and let steam with a lid on for about 3-5 minutes, or until the kale has wilted. Remove the kale and water from the pan.

Dry out the same pan and return to the stove over medium heat. Add the bacon to the pan and cook for about 3 minutes. Add the onion to the pan and cook until translucent, about 3 more minutes.

Grease a baking sheet with a couple of teaspoons of olive oil. Stretch the dough out to about a 14-inch-by-10-inch shape (doesn’t need to be perfect), leaving the dough a little thicker toward the edge as a crust. Lightly brush with olive oil.

Bake the crust at 450 degrees for about 5 minutes, or until the crust starts to look golden.

Remove the crust from the oven and add the sauce, followed by the mozzarella, kale, bacon and onion. Grate the sweet potato over the top of the pizza. Sprinkle with the crushed red pepper.

Return the pizza to the oven and cook for about 10-15 minutes, or until the kale is crispy and the mozzarella has bubbled.

Makes 3-4 servings.

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